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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What a pain!!!! I got it all taken care of in about 3-4 hours, but what a real PITA it was! I couldn't get to those darn bolts in the back to disconnect the fuel lines from the lower intake. Had I been able to remove those 2 bolts then everything would have come right off the top of my engine.

I ended up lifting it up while reaching under to remove the gaskets.

Has anyone found a way to remove those 2 without destroying anything. I would have much prefered to completely remove the lower manifold.

I also changed out the upper (common chamber) gasket and now my car idles so smooth I can barely tell the engine is running. :)
 

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What a pain!!!! I got it all taken care of in about 3-4 hours, but what a real PITA it was!
Why would you want to remove the complete manifold? The lower gaskets can be changed in about 30 minutes by a competent mech. Bansil took his in under warranty and they were finished in right at 30 minutes. I can do it under an hour.

I've never heard of an upper gasket failure. I'm sure there has been, but they are not the ones that are problematic.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The upper intake gasket didn't fail, but I decided to replace it anyway since the kit came with it.

I have a feeling that the layout of the '99 Passport fuel rail is very different from the '99 Isuzu Rodeo. I get the feeling that on the Rodeo it doesn't sit on top of the common chamber. Since the fuel rail sits on top, there is no way to raise the assembly unless you remove it, and that pretty much means taking off a lot of stuff.

There is no way to raise the intake assembly on the Passport without popping out the fuel rail. The rail prevents you from removing several of the bolts that are holding the complete assembly to the head of the engine.

I was forced to pop out all the injectors from the lower manifold, lift up the common chamber so I could get access to the bolts in the rear that held this cover over the fuel regulator and then that allowed me to get enough room to raise the whole intake assembly about one inch after removing the common chamber and twisting the fuel rail upwards as far as was safe.

The intake and fuel rails look nothing at all like the pictures in the Hayne's book and those shop manuals from the Russian site also did not help.

On your engines, is the fuel rail a U shaped bar that is mounted to the top of the common chamber? On my engine the only way to remove the common chamber is by sliding it underneath the fuel rail.

The last mechanic that did this same job many moons ago said it was an extremly frustrating job on my car.
 

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Oracle,

What you describe sounds like the set-up on my 98 rodeo. I doubt honda changed anything on this engine.

I totally understand what you are saying. I've removed my intake twice (for cylinder head work). There was physical pain and blood involved both times, because of the bolts that hold the fuel lines at the back of the manifold. :evil:

I think others have had success just lifting the manifold enough to replace the gaskets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wow I find it odd that anyone was able to lift the intake at all without removing the fuel rail. It kept striking the firewall and didn't lift high enough to clear the studs at the base of the lower intake. :shock:

I'll try a little "harder" next time, if there is a next time.

I guess the engineers never paid any mind to the idea that someone might actually want to inspect the sealing surfaces properly as part of a gasket change without pulling the engine or using some special tools for the application. :evil:
 

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Wow I find it odd that anyone was able to lift the intake at all without removing the fuel rail. It kept striking the firewall and didn't lift high enough to clear the studs at the base of the lower intake.
I don't know how you got that bolt off WITHOUT lifting the manifold. (My fuel rail was loose and all the injectors were removed from the rail at this point). As soon as it got high enough to clear the studs, I'd twist it a little and then set it back down.

I'm sure there is a better procedure. It took a couple of times of removing my EGR tube before I figured out the easiest way. The bolt on the back of the head that holds the EGR tube can be reached from underneath. :eek:

Perhaps the same could be done with this bolt.
 

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Hey guys, would my '94 Trooper LS with the 3.2L DOHC be the same engine that's in your Passport? Just wondering as I may someday need to do the same work to mine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I managed to get a 10 mm open end wrench behind there. I have small hands, and thick skin, and more 4 letter words than I thought I had in my vocabulary. It worked for the driver's side.

The EGR assembly was in the way for the passenger side, so I was forced to leave that one in place and wiggle the rail over to that side.

I'm sure I'll be able to do it much faster next time, but for some reason I don't feel comfortable about paying a mechanic to do it this way. Then again, I probably wouldn't say that if I saw the bill. :shock:

At least I didn't do it "wrong" in the end. While I thought I could get away with more, I ended up following everyone else's footsteps.

BTW, the upper manifold gasket was hellish to clean off the surface. It broke in many places and needed some serious persuasion to work loose. Hindsight being 20/20 I wouldn't have changed it even though the gasket kit came with that gasket.
 
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