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Well what a beast. After the front brakes and hubs I thought rear ones would be easy. [email protected][email protected]!

Whoever did rear breaks last time did not put silicone grease on pin bolts thru caliper to mount. Snapped off head of one bolt on each side. Luckily after trying everthing to get rest of pin bolt out (should have been easy as I cut them off old junk caliper just below caliper body and removed from mount bracket) The remaining non threaded part of slide pin bolt was frozen in the caliper mounting bracket. Not wanting to have to buy new brackets. My nieghbor the fabricator got them out,

First he tried arc welding a Nut to top of cut off threadless pin bolt stuck in bracket. However snapped the bolt head off with impact wrench. They he did something awesome. He welded another nut on small portion left above bracket. Then welded a piece of threaded grade 8 thred on top of the nut. THen put piece of steel pipe about 2 inches on top of the welded bolt. Then put washer bigger then top of steel pipe on and then another nut. THis acted as a PULLER and was able to pull the pin out. Interesting we found both were slightly bent and that was reason they were not coming out. Must have bent from braking or heat?

Cleaned up holes and chambers in bracket and mounted to trooper. However I held off mounting caliper to bracket as I noticed the two new bolts that came with calipers are not the same. ONe is solid and one has small tapered pin at end of the bolt. I expanded parts catalog for Trooper online and can see the solid bolt goes into the hole closest to the bleeder nipple. But for the life of me I can not figure out why they are different. THe holes in the mount are the same on both sides. See no reason for the one with small pin on end. Any ideas?
 

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G'day,

My understanding/experience.

1. The rear caliper guide and lock bolts (as you also have discovered (me too!)) are notorious for seizing and snapping off.

2. The upper guide bolt has the less-than-cylindrical shaft and supposedly was intended to 'stir' the lubricant when the 'lazy' pad change method is performed i.e. only the lower lock bolt is removed and the caliper is pivotted-up on the guide bolt to change the pads (hence the names of the bolts). In my experience, this is poor practice because the bolts are far too prone to rusting.

3. The best practice is to routinely remove and lube both the guide and lock bolt shafts - more regularly than the pad change interval.

Cheers.
 
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I believe iceshark was talking about the 1994 trooper ( 2nd gen)
 
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