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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thought I would share some choice moments and discoveries I have had over the last 18 months of ownership ... some bad, but a lot good and to be honest I love her to bits. Remember this is in the UK so there are some slight references that may differ :D

One LWB 1990 Bighorn. 2.8TD Lotus Edition.

Cracked 150,000 Km on the odometer getting it home. Not a bad drive up from Southampton Uk to Norwich UK. Just over 200 miles and ran quite sweetly. Now all I need to do is tidy her up a bit and sort out an annoying whistling/squeeling noise that seems to come and go. Not speed related, and you can make it come and go by pushing the pedal slightly harder and softer. Thinking it could be the altenator belt, but suggestions so far have been exhaust manifold (which I doubt as that is more a popping sound from experience) to Clutch (bloody numpty mechanics).











 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Ok its been a while, and I haven't done anything anyway near what some of you have done. Been mainly driving it and getting to know her. There were a few issues that needed adressing.

The turbo went on me. White smoke, no power, arrgh. Fortunatly I had a spare in the garage that I knicked off a mate a few years back that I was going to shove on my ratty Cavalier for a laugh. Thank christ I didn't. When taking the old one off I discovered the source of the screeching. One of the exhaust manifold nuts (front lower) was missing, and the bolt behind it was loose. Slapped on a new exhaust manifold gasket. Cleaned up all the oil and water pipes. gave the quick warm up system a thorough scrubbing, and shoved it all back together.

Took two or three days as I went at it slowly to get to know the engine and make sure a proper job was done. Fortunatly for me the manifold bolts came off without snapping or rounding, however the manifold to turbo bolts were a different matter. That spare turbo I had had the manifold with it so I used that one instead, but quickly realised that it didn't have the outlet for the pipe that goes to the EGR valves. Not to worry I thought. Leave it off and blank it off, along with blanking off the EGR vales to the inlet manifold. Noticed quite a few vacuum pipes were as rotten as 2 year old apples and went about replacing them as well. Did a mini service by changing the oil, oil filter, and flushed out all the coolant. Made lots of big brown puddles that day. Encountered another hitch when I went to take the thermostat out and test it and split the gasket (stupid paper things). No-one had one in stock, or paper that was thick enough. Fortunatly I remembered quite a few people telling me in the past (including the parts manager at the local Vauxhall dealership :D ) that cereal boxes do the same job. Unfortunatly all the cereal boxes I had were too thin, but noticed that the hard cover of a haynes manual was just the right size. 5 mins later I had one replacement gasket. flushed out the engine while the thermostat was off. Put the bottom radiator hose back on and filled with nice clean fresh coolant. Double checked everything was in order and started her up. No bangs or unwanted explosions. Got her up to temperature and topped up the coolant and put the cap back on. Went for a drive around town and she sounds and drives loverly now. No screeching or wailing. When I got back home, I looked at the oil and coolant level and everything seems fine.

Now today I got up nice and early to make a start on some more bits and pieces.



That front bumper and grill are really tatty. Plus also if you look at the fog lights you can see that water has got in there and rusted the reflector up. I spent some time taking it all off and took the chance to look behind it all.





Had some surface rust and the grill looks quite old and is faded to whit in some places. Whipped off the grill and gave it a good clean, then a couple of coats of Halford own Gloss Black. Took a wire brush to the front cross member and attacked it with some hammerite.

Finished result when the grill was put back on:



The fog light wasn't working :(



As she is an Import its an aftermarket jobby. Took the bulb out and gave all the terminals a clean, and tested the bulb actually worked. Still no joy. Traced the wire to the front cabin and found a hidden switch under the steering wheel on the lower dash (the panel that hides the pedals). And here is me thinking that the person who put it on would use the fog light switch on the dash :?

Even so it was not connected to any power. Fiddled around and eventually wired the extra switch to the light and hey presto :D



Some numpty before me had decieded to wire in a stereo. When I say wire in ... what I really meant to say was to grab as many wires as possible and stuff them all into a connector block and hope it works. It didn't



After spending some time tracing the speaker wires and sorting them out, then quite a bit of time soldering I ended up with this :D



Much much better, and it works like a dream now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
On a bad note ... the front bumper was quite badly rusted. These are the worst parts. I might have to get a new steel middle section





Been busy busy busy. Decieded not to get the new bumper and just refurb the old one with stuff I had in the garage. Old tin of Hammerite, various rattle cans and bolts etc. Much cheaper and to be honest she is never going to be a looker. Pulled the bumper and nudge bars apart and cleaned them up then several coats of paint and laquer I ended up with this. As said not perfect, but should last a few more years yet.

Nudge bars prior to stripping:



Nudge bars stripped



Nudge bars painted:



All back together:



Also managed to spend some time doing some electrics. I worked out the front spot lamps come on when any of the front lights are on and the dash switch is activated. Not liking this I dug out an old loom from the garage and set about re-wiring it all. Now I am about 95% of the way there. New loom complete with relay and 30 amp fuse put in. They should (if I am lucky) come on only when the full beam is on. I also re-wired the dash switch so I can choose to have them off when full beam is on as well as an overide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok thought I would post something about how to refurb your Mk.1 rear brakes. They are notorious for the handbrake being dire. I was kind of forced into the situation after a failed MOT, so went out and bought a new set of pads and disks for the rear.

Whipped the wheel off and found this:



and after removing the calipers was greeted by these bad boys :(



Funnily it passed the efficiency test, but was failed on lack of movement (read siezed)

Anyways to recon your rear brakes here is how I did it. Wheel off and look at the caliper. You will need to loosen several things before you can take everything off. Don't forget to clamp the flexi hose or you will end up with brake fluid all over your driveway ... well more than you need.

I have highlighted the areas that need to be undone in the next few pictures. As said don't take the bolts out, just loosen them so you can undo them with your fingers.




1) Chock front wheels and let off the handbrake.

2) Jack up both rear wheels and rest car on axle on axle stands, then remove rear wheels.

3) Under the car in line with the front passenger seat is the handbrake cable adjuster. Using a 12mm spanner slaken it right off.

4) Undo Flexi hose (Part "1") with a 17mm socket and move it out of the way. Make sure you have clamped it somewhere on the rubber bit to prevent excess fluid loss. This has a copper washer above and below the banjo union. Don't lose them.

5) Remove split pin and handbrake cable pin (Part "2")

6) Parts "3" are two 6mm allen bolts. These are the caliper sliders. They are hidden under two rubber caps. Remove the rubber caps (the top comes off completely, the bottom has a plastic cap). Slaken them both off but dont remove

7) Parts "4" are the bolts that hold on the caliper mount on. Again using a 17mm socket just slaken them

8) Once this has been done you can remove the entire caliper. Start with the slider bolts and take them out completely. The caliper should come off now pulling towards the rear of the car.

9) The caliper mount can also be removed now by undoing its two bolts.

10) The old disk can now be removed either by hitting it with a hammer from the inside. If it was anything like mine it might require quite a bit of persuasion.

11) Clean and Copperslip the face of the hub and wheel bolts so you have something like this:



12) On the caliper mount you will notice two metal clips that hold the pads in place. Mine were cruddy as hell, so I popped them out and used a dremmel wire brush to get them all nice and shiney again. Cleaned up the mount and popped the metal clips back in again.

13) Put the new disk back onto the hub and re-attach the caliper mount. I held the disk in place with two wheel nuts to prevent it wobbling about, as you can see in the final picture.

14) The caliper is made up of a spring loaded arm that the handbrake cable attaches to, a piston, and on the rear face a hidden 4mm allen nut that is behind a thin faced 14mm bolt. If you look on the back of the caliper you can see the bolt (item "5" in the picture below). Take it off using a socket and you will see the allen hole. By turning this allen nut you can wind the piston backwards and forwards. I found that the piston wouldn't wind back far enough on the drivers side (after I had unseized it). Turns out that the piston is slightly more complicated than I thought.



How to free a seized piston:

i) With caliper in hand remove the ring that holds the rubber seal around the piston.

ii) Remove the rubber seal by pulling it off. Careful not to tear it.

iii) Get your 4mm allen key and work the nut until you cannot feel any resistance. It has a tolerance between moving the piston in and out where its doesn't do anything. You have several revolutions like this. Turn it until you have the middle of this slack point.

iv) Get some molegrips and clamp the very outside end of the piston (the bit that is exposed when the seal is on) and give it some movement twisting it back and forth by 30 degrees or so either way Until its free. Some WD40 will help here.

v) Now if you have found out that you can wind the piston out with the allen key, but cannot wind it in you have a greater issue (as I had). The piston had a funny gubbins thing inside it that is held there by a great circlip. This has a thread in the middle which locates onto a bolt that is turned by the allen key. When the piston cannot be wound back in the gubbins thingy (GT for short) has popped out the back of the piston. Not a great issue if you know what you are looking for ... pain in the proverbial if you don't. To get the GT back into the piston you have to wind the piston out as far as possible and then gripping it with the molegrips gently work it out completely. If you look inside the chamber you can now see the GT. You can now twist off the GT by spinning it with your finger. Note which way it came out. When looking closer you can see it has a chunky wire circlip, and several teeth. On the bottom a spring held in with a circlip. To put it back into the piston just place the piston on the ground and tap the GT in square with a soft mallet making sure you have the spring end of the GT facing you.

vi) Getting the piston back in again is a bit of a chore, but possible. Slide it in as far as it will go. Get a 10mm spanner and use it as a lever in the cutout against the face of the piston, then gently wind the allen head in to draw the piston past the seal. If you hear a "ping" and the piston doesn't move you have pulled the GT out again and you have to re-insert it. If you can get a third hand its easier if you gently twist the piston back and forth as your doing it to get past the inner seal. Its the inner seal that makes things difficult here.

vii) Once you have wound it in about halfway, replace the outer seal along with its metal clip.

Back to the original job in hand

15) Wind the piston in as far as it will go. Take your inner brake pad (the one with 3 clips on the backplate) and pop it onto the piston.

16) Slide the outer brake pad into the metal sliper plates on the caliper mount after copper slipping the slider plates.

17) Copper slip the slider bolts, and push the caliper into place on the caliper mount and push the slider bolts back in. The "normal" bolt goes in the top, and "stepped" bolt goes nto the bottom. Make sure you push the handbrake cable though its guide hole on the braket on the caliper as you place the caliper. Tighten up the slider bolts with a 6mm allen key. Replace the plastic/rubber caps.

18) Re-attach the brake flexi and handbrake cable. You should now have something like this:





Now go and do the other side.

Next post ... bleeding adjusting the handbrake :(

NOTE: You do not have to undo the brake flexi if you are just replacing the disks and pads. Item "1" can be left in place. I only had to as I had to free up a siezed cylinder and therefore needed the caliper off completely. If you can wind the piston in completely without hassles then feel free to ingore this part. If however you manage to hear a "ping" while the cylinder is being wound in and the piston stops moving ... then your gonna have to take it ALL apart.

Now for the most annoying part of it all.

The easy bit is the bleeding. Now if you haven't removed the brake flexi you can ignore this stage as you should still have a nice dry driveway/garage. If you had to take the flexi off and dismantle the caliper then you will have brake fluid all over the shop, in your boots and eyes and all the little cuts and grazes. Brake fluid is a pain like that.

Bleeding:

1) Pop the bonnet and take the cap off the fluid reservoir

2) Go to the passenger side and put on your bleeding kit (I use a one man kit from Halfords. Does the job and not too expensive)

3) Crack the bleed nipple open and pump your brake pedal. Double check the fluid levels in the reservoir and top up as necessary.

4) Tighten the nipple when bled

5) Repeat for the drivers side

Adjusting the handbrake:

1) First off you need to adjust the pistons in the caliper both sides. They should be all the way in at the moment. Remember that flat 14mm bolt I told you about that had the secret 4mm allen adjuster under it. You need to sit behind the wheel and adjust the allen nut until you can feel/hear the pads biting. When you do remember the position of the allen key and undo it till you get to that slack moment I described between pulling and pushing the piston out. Pull the piston back a touch to free it again then spin the allen until you are in the middle of the slack point. I assume the slack point is a period when the piston is free to float in and out regardless of the postion of the GT.

2) Repeat for the other side.

3) Get someone to sit in the drivers seat and start the car then pump the brake pedal. Double check you are getting braking on the rear wheels. You shouldn't be able to turn them. For gods sake don't put the car in gear. All the while double check the fluid levels as you may get some loss as the brake system starts running at full power.

4) Adjust the pistons each time until your happy with the results, but switch the car off each time you go underneath.

5) Now the fun part of the handbrake. You need to get underneath the car and wind in the 12mm nut until you can pull the handbrake untill about half its length and the rear wheels cannot be turned by hand. You may find you need to adjust the allen nuts and the 12mm nut for hours on end until you get the right balance. Sometimes its there first time ... mostly its not.

6) Once done lock the handbrake cable tensioner into place with the other (the one towards the front of the car) 12mm nut. Then replace the two 14mm bolts that cover the 4mm allen nuts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Got a new paint job over the weekend.




Not bad for a set of worn road tyres and never came out of 2wd. Achieved while doing setup and take down for a re-enactment event in the boggiest of fields ever. The mud was up to the sump in some places.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok as some of you might know I have had a few issues with Banshee lately. First off was the constant metallic ratting coming from the engine bay when running. At first I thought it was the aircon pump and seeing as I didn't use aircon just left it. I did the once a week switching on and running for 10 mins or so, but to no joy. I had pretty much assumed the gas was gone. Anyways last friday (5th November) as I left work I pulled out the yard at work only to have the power steering die on me. Popped the bonnet and had a ganders. Full of fluid and no belts bust so I limped her the 42 miles home from work through the Suffolk/Norfolk countryside home to Norwich. Arms aching and feeling like lead I lifted the bonnet and looked again, but with the engine running. Scanned the bay with a torch and noticed bits of metal flake flying off the steering pump pulley. Bearings had gone and covering the bay with a metallic sheen. Off to the scrappy in the morning to pillage a replacement off a 3.1 Mk.2 I had seen before.

So there I was the proud owner of a replacement pump, bottle of AT Fluid, box of tools, and lots of keen.

Heres what I started with:



First off was to loosen the steering pump. Three bolts to start with. Two at the front:



One at the back:



Next was to disconnect the reservoir, but I had to drain it first. Easy enough by undoing this hose. Sits to the right of the radiator. Held on by a simple clip.



This hose plumbs into the bottom of the reservoir. Once you have disconnected this you have to just let all the oil drain out. Hopefully into the bowl you put underneath. Once you have done this disconnect the hose that goes from the reservoir to the pump.



Now I had to clean out the reservoir as It seemed that when the bearings went, just as much metal was in the fluid as was over the engine bay. So I needed to flush it all out.

Mucky filter:



Thats after a quick clean. The bottom of the reservoir had a layer of gunge about 5mm thick :shock:

Once you have taken these pipes off you can empty the system of old oil. This is a very easy method, but also quite messy. Can be made tidier if you have a couple of old towels to lay in the bay to catch the old oil. To drain the system fully jack up the front of the truck so both wheels are off the ground. Make sure you rest it on axle stands and the stands are clear of the wheels when they are fully turned left or right. The oil is emptied by turning the wheel from left to right fully several times. I counted 20 odd times left and right turning the wheel quite quickly. This will result in oil spraying out of the pump and the open hose ... hence the warning about mess. Once the system is drained you can remove the pump completely by undoing the tensioner bolt:



Removing the two belts (one if no aircon) and taking off the top hose from the pump:



When all this is done you can pull the pump off and go about putting the new one on.

General notes to think of. The 3.1 and 2.8 diesel both share the same pump wether they are from a Trooper or Wizard or Monterey regardless of what the part number is. The pump and the fittings are all identical between all models and years. My old pump is a 1990 import Mk.1 Trooper. The donor pump was a 1996 Mk.2 Trooper. Two completely different part numbers and generations. Both exactly the same pump and fittings. I also used a big bottle of Automatic Transmission Fluid as opposed to Power Steering Fluid. Does exactly the same and cheaper (cheers Grandad for this big tip :thumbup: )

Now when bleeding the system of air put everything back on again and fill the reservoir with fluid. Keep the front wheels off the ground and keep topping the reservoir up untill it reaches the minimum level. Leave it for a while to settle down and some of the air will gradually float to the top I went for a cuppa and ciggy at this point. Now turn the steering wheel from side to side to full lock 7 or 8 times. Check the fluid level in the reservoir and top up again to the minimum level if necessary. Reapeat this as many times as you need to and remember to not top up above the minimum level at this stage. Now once you get to the stage that the level stays constant no matter how many times you turn the wheel you need to start the engine to get the pump working. The wheels need to be off the ground still. You may find that the fluid level will drop a little during this stage, but not by much if you have done a good job so far. Now turn the wheel again from full lock either way several times and again check the level. Top up if necessary. Hold it on full lock for a second or two each time. If you hear the steering pump "whining" then you still have air in your system, and you need to switch off and repeat the side to side thing again. Once you have switched off the engine you will have to wait a while for the air to settle before bleeding. Time for a cuppa and ciggy again! Now if your at the stage that the pump isn't whining while turning with the engine running drop the truck to the ground and start her up again. Now turn the wheel again to full lock. This will make the pump work harder as its has to overcome the resistance of the tyres on the ground. Give the engine a little gas as well to spin the pump faster. Again listen for the pump and if its not whining pack up and go inside with the knowledge of a job well done. If it is jack her up again and turn that wheel with the engine off. Remembering to let things settle after switching the engine off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Now for the fun bit ... NOT!!

What I thought was the aircon pump rattling ... then thought was the power steering pump as that failed ... my original theory was confirmed when the aircon pump siezed on me during the steering fluid bleeding. Fortunatly for me it was while the engine was idling and I was stood next to the ignition. The horrible clanking, chinking, grinding noises made me panic and kill the engine in time before the belt started slipping and melting/snapping and causing who knows what damage. This left me in a dilemma as where to go. At first I thought I should just get a new aircon pump and carry on. Then I hit a few hurdles.

1) I had a 20 year old truck that is set up for R12 refrigerant which was made illegal 10 years ago.

2) I would have to convert my system to the normally used R134a refrigerant which would involve having to drain the entire system of oil and gas and replacing the expansion valve for the new gas.

3) Refrigerant cannot just be released into atmosphere (its illegal and damages the atmosphere. I am not an eco-terrorist but have read the effect of refrigerants on the atmoshpere and its quite scary) Instead it needs to be sucked out and destroyed appropriatly) This again costs money.

4) Get the system vacuumed out and dried and recharged with R134a and the appropriate oil PAG (Polyalkalene Glycol).

5) Hope I don't have any leaks and have to replace the parts as necessary.

This was going to cost a fortune. The reason you need to get the system recharged again is an aircon unit requires the gas and oil to circulate together to keep everything lubed up. This will keep all the bearings in the pump lubricated and stop them from getting dry and seizing. If you run out of gas then the oil cannot be passed around and everything starts to wear out. Now the biggest issue you will have is the power steering pump relies on the aircon pump being there to work as the belts go around them and the crank pulley. If you aircon pump dies then you also lose the power steering. That will hurt your arms.

Instead of all this hassle and agro and cost I decieded to go for the cheaper and easier option. Not all 3.1 and 2.8 diesel powered engines were fitted with aircon instead they had a pulley in its place. I never use it, and besides the appeal of ditching the entire thing to save weight, improve fuel economy, and release a couple of ponies all seemed a far far easier option. I quickly tested to see if I had any gas in the sysytem by pushing on one of the schraeder valves (filling valves) and no gas came out, It seems that the previous owner (my stepdad) never bothered with aircon either and didn't know of the ramifications of not keeping it serviced. That also confirmed my decision as I didn't have to pay for the gas to be removed. Next was to source the replacement pulley. Searched high and low for one to no avail. Then came a ray of sunshine from a buddy who put me onto a brilliant chap down Brighton way who had one, and for little money later I had a pulley land on my doorstep. Things are now going well.

Now first off I removed the aircon pump and all the hoses, drier, and condensor from the engine bay. This is a simple spannering job working from one corner to the other. The hardest part was removing the condensor that sits behind the grill and infront of the radiator. The hassle you will meet is there is a reinforcement bar that bolts to the front valence and the front slam panel. This effectively traps the condensor (radiator type thing) where it is. I resolved this with a bit of brute force. I undid the two bolts that connect this bar to the slam panel, and just yanked it forwards till it gave enough clearance that allowed me to pull the condensor forward and upwards away from the truck. I then just pushed it back into place again and bolted up again.

Once you have done this you should have a pile of bits like this :



Ignore the damage to the condensor. My original idea was to cut bits off it until it was small enough to remove. I got bored, tired and annoyed so looked for an alternative method, which I have described above :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Got myself some Vauxhall Frontera (read uk Wizard) Series A 15" pepperpot alloys. A couple of them were a bit tatty so a refurb was in order. Decieded against the complicated two tone colour scheme and settled for simple shiney black. Will match the bumper and nudge bars.

Before




Sanded



Primered



First coat of black



Not perfect, and have a nasty run, but after a bit of flattening and a couple more coats of black followed by some laquer they should look dandy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ok did a fair bit on the old girl today. Had a list of jobs that needed doing and testing.

First off was replacing the old wing mirrors. The clamps in the mirror bit are made of really cheap nasty brittle plastic that shatters quicker a easier than sugar glass. The net result was one being held on with an entire reel of insulation tape, and the other being a bad bodge of an old Land Rover Defender mirror



I have been looking for replacements for months now and to be honest people have been quoting me silly money for them (£80 for a pair of tired looking second hand ones that didn't have a guarantee of being intact). Fortunatly my patience has paid off and RBUCKINGHAM had some for sale. It was worth me popping down there during the week and driving back from Essex to get them. Cheers buddy, really appreciate it. Anyways we noticed the mounts for the new ones were different. My Import ones had four mounting holes in each corner and the ones off a UK model only had two. Not a problem I thought I would just use some nuts on the rear after drilling two new holes in the door.

Today I pulled off the old ones and found there is a backing plate inside the door behind the mirror position so I just drilled and tapped two new holes in it to accept the new mounts.



Then bolted the new mirrors on again. Adjusted them and now I can see behind me ... happy days ... I love it when a bodge comes together :D :D



Next thing I did was to do a trial fit of my Frontera Pepperpot wheels. Two of them had some 255 75/R15 tyres on them ... though a bit tired and almost bald, but good enough to judge clearance issues. So I swapped one of the front wheels over and drove it back and forth to get it to settle. Then turned it lock to lock to gauge clearance. All in all I was very happy with the results. I should be able to get some pretty chunky tyres on there if I wanted to, but to be honest considering most of my miles are going to be on-road (1850 per month just getting to work and back alone) I am probably going to stick with something that keeps my speedo accurate. Seeing as Pajero tyres are quite a common size and also fairly cheap as well I am probably going to go for some 265 70/R15's on there and they rims are offset enough to clear all the running gear. A much better size compared to the original 205 80/R16's I had on there when I got the truck.

Offset currently:



Offset with Frontera wheels:



And how they look:

Originally



Frontera Pepperpots



I even managed to get some more paint on two of the rims. All they need now is a few coats of Laquer to finish them, then I have to start on the other three.

All in all a successful day me thinks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Finally finished my new alloys. Metal tyre valves on order. New to me 31x10.5 R15 tyres being collected next weekend.

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My new metal tyre valves arrived today from Eblag. £8 delivered.



Fitted from the front:



And behind to show how it seals:



Have these valves on my Trooper at the moment and have to say they are brilliant, though I have replaced the metal caps with plastic ones to prevent the caps welding themselves on. Recommend them everytime as they are cheaper than rubber ones at the tyre fitters at £8 for four and last for ever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thought it was about time to get some new tyres as the temporary ones were a bit tired after 11,000 odd miles after I got them this time last year (they were second hand when I got them so I haven't ruined a new set in that time :D ).



Eblag and a buddy to the rescue and for a grand total of £120 later after buying and refurbing the rims and including £60 for the 5 off tyres and spare wheel cover and £25 for fitting balancing I have ended up with this

New Tread:



Side View:



Front View (excuse the rust ... project for the summer):



And they don't stick out too much to keep the boys in blue and Mr. MOT man happy:



Tyres have at least 8-9mm on them. 4 off Westlake H280 A/T's which seem able to handle some hard cornering even in the damp, and 1 off Bridgestone Dueller A/T. All in all very happy with the result.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Finally gotten round to making some proper EGR blanking plates. Looks so much cleaner now.



We have more relaxed emissions tests for older vehicles over here ... and to be honest the general opinion in the UK is that by removing the EGR's the 2.8 diesel runs smoother, cleaner, and by default has more grunt ... cannot see the point in introducing hot dirty air from the exhaust into the combustion chamber which would need clean cold air to run properly ... kind of makes an airfilter a token gesture really.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Spent 6 hours cleaning the Trooper and the wifes Astra. Good old wash polish and window polish. She looks a beauty now ... apart from the millions of rust patches, dings, and scrapes. Forgot what the paint looked like and how cool it looks with the sun gleaming on it

Before:








After:





 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Had a slight exhaust based incident. Ignore the bend aperture as that was necessary to remove it, but the bent face is probably where I smacked it one, and the holes are self explanitary. The scary thing is the tail pipe whch has cracked in half, not rusted through. Its a clean break.






Comparison to the new one.



All sorted now :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hmm ... tie rod ends. Mine was dubious to say the least and highlighted in the MOT. So time to change it as promised.



As you can see its pretty fubarred. Anyways here is how I changed it.

Tools required:
Trolley jack
Axle stand
19mm socket for wheel nuts
14mm spanner
22mm spanner x 2
Ball joint splitter
WD40
PTFE tape

Time taken 1/2 hour

Stage 1:

Jack up the truck under the wisbone and take the wheel off. Place the wheel under the sill of the ruck and chuck an axle stand under as well. This is for safety more than anything else.

Stage 2:



Get your WD40 and soak the locking nuts. Do both of them. They lock the tie rods in place to prevent the tracking from going out. Once you have done that and given it time to soak get one of the 22mm spanners and jam it between the wishbone and drive shaft. The other end goes onto the flats of the tie rod. Get your other 22 mm spanner and undo the locking nut. You will need to give it some force if its never been undone in 22 years. I had to use an adjustable spanner but its the same method. The picture shows the places you need to put the spanners. The adjustable is floating at the moment, but shows where on the tierod it needs to be placed.

Stage 3:



Once the locking nut is undone get your PTFE tape and wrap it around the thread to mark where the tie rod comes to. If you don't have any PTFE tape you can always use a marker pen or some tipex.

Stage 4:



Get your ball joint splitter out and pop the old joint from the hub. If its being stubburn the put the joint under pressure and smack the hub where the hammer is in the picture. This will shock it out. I didn't need to hammer it, but I think I was lucky.

Stage 5:



Unscrew the ball joint counting the number of turns.

Stage 6:



Compare the old and new tie rod ends. As you can see from the picture the new one is slightly longer than the old one. You will have to take this into account when screwing on the new one. I screwed it on the same number of turns I took the old one off. I then turned it again to take into account the difference in length. Once you have done that lock it into place with the locking nut.

Stage 6:



Stand back and be proud. Put the wheel back on and take a trip to the local tyre/exhaust centre and have the tracking double checked. You are allowed a 1mm margin of error. I had my tracking checked a few months back and it was spot on. After doing this it was just under that 1mm. The guys at the station nipped it up for me for a fiver anyways as I had freed up all the adjusters and all they had to do was tweak it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Found a Mk.III in a scrappy with all its running gear and drivetrain missing. Happened to be a lotus edition. However the steering wheel was still there so I nabbed the centre boss.

Old:



New:



Slowly getting the little things addressed and tarting it up. main thing for the interior I would like to fix is the headrest clips. The side ones for the bolsters are knackered missing and apparently Isuzu don't do them anymore. Might see If you can get them in the states.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Just completed my 2" suspension lift and I am pleased with the results to be honest. I made the shackles myself apart from a bit of welding which a friend kindly obliged me with his talents. Also the loan of "Grandad's" drill press to drill the holes (I think I left the 18mm drill bit in there as I cannot find it :? )

Anyways here is what I did. Before doing anything I measured the distance from the top of the alloy wheel at the rears to the arch. Do both sides for reference.

A few pictures showing where I started and examples of arch clearance using a tobacco tin



Arch Clearance Rear



Arch Clearance Front



New and shiney shackles



First off I jacked up the truck as far as it would go. I opted to lift it under the rear diff with a big block of wood between the jack point and the diff. This meant that I could get her as high as possible. Once she was as high in the air as I could I then chucked a couple of axle stands under the front leaf mounts.

Next stage was to remove the rear shackles. I lowered the leaves down until I could feel movement in them. If too high and too low they will be quite rigid in the mounts. The sweet spot will mean they aren't gripping to the bushes.

Next stage is to undo them. Now I had soaked them every night for a week before hand and I fully expected them to be stuck fast and have to cut them off. I was pleasantly surprised that even though 21 years of abuse had been inflicted on them they came off a treat.

Before





During



After



Shackles eventually removed



After that I then attached the new shackles to the body mounts.



Now the next bit is the risky bit. You have to remove the wheels so you can lower the leaves so the new shackles line up with the leaf ends. You may be lucky and have the truck lifted high enough to leave the wheels on. Once both Shackles are attached you jack the truck up again to get the wheels off. This will be a lot easier if you have three jacks like I do. I lowered the axle to attach the shackles. Then I got my second and third jacks out to lift the axle slowly a bit at a time working left and right from under the point where the leaf meets the axle. This minimises the chance the truck will lean and slide sideways off the stands and jacks. I cannot stress more that you need to do this on a solid surface. I used a couple of paving slabs under my jacks.

Once the shackles and wheels are on double triple check everything is nice and tight and take it for a drive around the block to settle everything.



Now to the front. This is either going to be a pain in the neck (literally) or really easy. All I can say is I found it a doddle and lifted the front in less than 15 mins. I again soaked the torsion bar bolts every night for a week. Take a tape measure and record the distance from the top of the alloy to the wheel arch both sides. To adjust the height this is the fella your looking for.



See that big bolt head. You need a 27mm socket and a breaker bar to suit. You need to soak the entire assembly the bolt goes through. You cannot use enough WD40 trust me. Now for the lift itself. You can leave the wheels on for this and get your trolly jack with a big block of wood on and lift the truck under a suitable crossmember. I used the one under the join between the engine and gearbox. Lift the truck so the wheels are just touching the ground. Then get your breaker bar and socket and turn the bolt head 6 full turns clockwise. Once done lower the truck and go for a drive again around the block. She should settle down nicely after this. Measure the distance and you should have something between 1 1/2" to 2" of lift. What ever you do do not lift the front more than the rear. You will have some interesting handling issues. Make sure the front is the same and at worse lower than the rear. You should now be done.

Here are the post lift reference shots:

Rear Clearance



Front Clearance



Final lift picture:



Hope this is of use to people.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well its been over a month since I last did anything to Banshee, and today the weather was glorious so I attacked her with zeal. I had several projects and ideas in mind so I went about putting them in action.

Yesterday I happened to stumble accross a Mk.I 2.6 petrol SWB that had seen better days. A fair bit of under body rot from a brief inspection. Not wanting to lament the loss of another Mk.I I set about stripping various bits off her. Mainly trim for now as mine is tatty.

First off was the lack of clock in mine. I am always for fitting as many genuine OEM optional extras to my vehicles and the lack of clock could of been solved easily with a trip to poundland, but this old Trooper had one that was soon nabbed. I even managed to replace the damaged blanks with new ones. If you look closely you can see the holes have disappeared.

Centre Console Pocket:



Centre Console Clock:



After that I replaced my headlight switch. The old one worked but it was easy to knock it in thus switching the lights off when pushing the rear demister switch. Not good when its dark.

Old Switch:



New Switch:



After that its was time to mount the CB I got last month. Spent ages trying to figure out where to put it so it didn't get in the way, and have wires trailing all over the place. Eventually settled on mounting it beside the drivers seat onto the centre console. This enabled me to mount the Aerial on the roof above the drivers head. Feed the aerial in at the top rear of the door, behind the piller trim, under the carpet, along nifront of the drivers seat, and finally up into the base of the unit. I then fed the power lead of the CB under the carpet, along the gearbox tunnel, cut a hole in the carpet to pull it through, up behind the dash into an ignition live feed. The mic was mounted on the speedo dials. All in all it looks quite tidy I felt. I had to make a bracket up and rivet it to the centre console to bolt the main unit to.





Quite chuffed to be honest with the finished article.

Next I replaced the centre dial surround. Mine had holes in everywhere where people had drill it to bolt various things to. Basically it annoyed me out with the old in with the new.

Old:



New:



Last was a mobile phone mount. Just got a new phone and it has Satnav on it, though the free mobile phone holder is next to useless trying to fit it anywhere on my teeny tiny dash. So I made up a little bracket to attach it to. Found a couple of holes already in the dash that were there when I bought it, so utilised them to screw it down.



All in all a good days tinkering.
 

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this is awesome!!! I been thinking about making a bumper like yours do you think you can give me the measurements of the nudge bars?
 
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