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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In an effort to gain the maximum articulation from the front suspension of my Trooper I removed the front swaybar. I took several before and after measurements, and took pictures at each wheel for reference. The results are very impressive!

Note: I am not recommending that you remove your swaybar, as reduced road handling results (emergency lane change, etc.) This vehicle is not driven daily, and is used only for off-highway trips, etc.

Write-up: http://www.expeditionswest.com/equipment/trooper/suspension_travel/Trooper_articulation.html

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
An inch of extension travel is quite an improvement, one that I could really notice when the suspension would cycle off-road (it wouldnt bottom out up the UCA bump-stop) If you look at it from a % standpoint it improved by 12%, which is nonticeable.

The biggest issue with lifting the front of our Isuzu's it that you loose extension travel (there are no drop bracket lifts that I am aware of) when you crank the torsion bars. For every inch of lift you crank in, you loose the same amount of extension travel, which hurts off-road droop travel. It is really a balance between ground clearance and having enough droop travel.

In reality though, the biggest off-road performance improvement came from removing the swaybar. The front end is so much more compliant off-road, and traction/articulation is greatly improved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oh cruiserman, that would be very nice! A SAS conversion on a Trooper does not look to be too difficult. The only unknown for me would be the minimum lift required for oil pan clearance. I would not want to lift the truck much more than it is now. Maybe just enough for 315's 8)
 

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You also have at least an inch of body flex in there.
 

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So what's involved in making or sourcing some swaybar quik disconnects for those of us that are mostly DD's, but want to maximize handling when trail riding?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The shape (bend) of the swaybar makes it difficult to totally disconnect without hitting the tires on tight turns. One of the disconnects that retain the bar and slides up and down would be ideal. I believe there are several Toyota disconnects that use this principle. You could also cut, and sleeve the swaybar in the center, and use a pin when it is locked.

I find most disconnects to be a real pain. Even the ones on my Jeep are difficult to use, and remain mostly disconnected.

I do notice a great deal more sway from the Trooper now. I might investigate building a set of disconnects that are easy to use. I am sure someone has resolved this problem, I just havent seen the solution yet.
 

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If you build a set of disconnects you will have around of applause from me. In past references to sourcing sway bar disconnects I have yet to see a viable solution even after extensive modifications to aftermarket Toy, Jeep, GM, or the stock 2nd gen. Isuzu connects. And I have come across many ideas on the trail, but most fail after only a short while. Snapped pins and bent mounts are the 2 most common, due to the stress applied to them.

Right now the most common solution is to remove the sway bars altogether.......but it is not a recommended procedure due to the new handling characteristics mentioned above. If your comfortable with the vehicle roll and know how to have full control of your rig and don't do a lot of street driving I say remove them. If you daily drive the streets alot and find yourself on twisty of high speed roads such as myself, don't do it and start saving for an SAS.

Craig
 

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Heck, my Trooper feels like it riding on a longitudinal piano hinge, anyway. It's a rolling fool with the swaybar connected.

I don't even wanna know how much the ol' girl would lean if I disconnected/removed it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Using the correct shocks on a Trooper is critical to good handling and controlling pitch off highway. My Trooper in stock condition was awful to drive off-road because the shocks were to softly valved for the trail. I installed OME firm shocks several years ago, and it totally transformed the trucks handling, mainly off-road. The ride is somewhat stiffer, but I prefer that, given the load I usually carry on expeditions...
 

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Hmmm I remember reading a write up on making swaybar disconnects for isuzu....what site was that on...oh yah HERE! http://www.planetisuzoo.com/articles.htm/2

I considered makin em but after readin some accounts I found out they weren't really "quick" disconnects, more like PITA disconnects. So I just ditched my swaybar. It has a tiny bit more body roll now, but I kinda like it more. You realize the handling feels kind of numb with the swaybar on. Rubo thought I was crazy for driving on the highway with no swaybar until he removed his- and liked it too. This is for rodeos though, YMMV

mike
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Yeah I read that article before as well.

Lots of good info but what I would like is a simple set up such as my dads XJ Cherokee. Slightly bent bar with 2 quick-release pins. Easy 1-2-3 and the rig as more movement. After the trails 1-2-3 and the rig has an almost stock highway ride. No in between, either all flex or all solid.

From what I remember with the contour of the 2G Troopers sway bar and the set up of the IFS, the only way to set up a dis-connect is the way described in the article. Granted I haven't looked closely at a 2G in years.

If I ever get one I'll prolly look in to it in more depth. But for now its back in the opposite direction to rebuilding my early 1st Gen Trooper.

Craig
 

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Lots of good info but what I would like is a simple set up such as my dads XJ Cherokee. Slightly bent bar with 2 quick-release pins. Easy 1-2-3 and the rig as more movement. After the trails 1-2-3 and the rig has an almost stock highway ride. No in between, either all flex or all solid.
Yes I have noticed jeeps have much simpler disconnects. And as you may have noticed, they have a totally different type of front suspension and a different set up for their sway bar. Thats why isuzus can't use the same set up for our sway bar. I don't envy this because I hate jeeps. :) Besides, like I said I don't miss my swaybar.

mike
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Yes I have noticed jeeps have much simpler disconnects. And as you may have noticed, they have a totally different type of front suspension and a different set up for their sway bar. Thats why isuzus can't use the same set up for our sway bar.
Noticed the different set-ups, and envied the SA front. Granted its a little D35 coil spring mounted weak axle but solid none the less. The differences are drastic obviously SA vs. IFS. Can't win them all I guess, they have a simple basic swaybar set-up in a Heep however, and some of us have a 2G with complex swaybar, but in a Zu. IMO a good trade off.

From what I've read from people who got rid of the bar I figure if I ever snag a 2G for me or the g/f, the short commutes we have would be no prob. with more car roll. Don't think we'd miss it as well.

My couple of pennies is all

Craig
 
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