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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I scrounged up a pretty good deal on a couple of old gerry cans this weekend (two for $20) but they've got a bit of rust on the interior. I was reading on another forum that it's a good idea to throw a handful of drywall screws/ball bearings/nuts/bolts/whatever into the can and then swash it around in there with some gas and then dump it out to get some of the rust off the walls and get it ready for treatment. Then I would use some good tank sealer and treat the interiors of the cans.

Just wondering if anyone else had any good ideas as well.
 

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That's what I did,then I used this product they sell for motorcycle tanks right now I can't remember what is called
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
tonnydoodles said:
That's what I did,then I used this product they sell for motorcycle tanks right now I can't remember what is called
Yeah, there appears to be a number of decent products out there, most of which are marketed towards motorcycles but I think that's what I'm going to use too.
 

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I'd be leery of using gasoline though. I think I'd use mineral spirits (paint thinner) as its not likely to blow up in your face if one of those screws causes a spark in the can.

I read an article years ago in Hot Rod magazine on cleaning an old fuel tank for a T-bucket build. Basically they used gravel and water and several hours of shaking to get it clean enough to use. BTW, they also said in the article that it took longer to get all the gravel out of the tank than it did to get it clean... Be prepared for a whole lotta shaken going on...
 

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johnnie59 said:
I'd be leery of using gasoline though. I think I'd use mineral spirits (paint thinner) as its not likely to blow up in your face if one of those screws causes a spark in the can.

I read an article years ago in Hot Rod magazine on cleaning an old fuel tank for a T-bucket build. Basically they used gravel and water and several hours of shaking to get it clean enough to use.
This sort of thing makes me wish I hadn't passed up that free 'paint shaker' machine, on craigslist a while back...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Selador AKA Tat said:
johnnie59 said:
I'd be leery of using gasoline though. I think I'd use mineral spirits (paint thinner) as its not likely to blow up in your face if one of those screws causes a spark in the can.

I read an article years ago in Hot Rod magazine on cleaning an old fuel tank for a T-bucket build. Basically they used gravel and water and several hours of shaking to get it clean enough to use.
This sort of thing makes me wish I hadn't passed up that free 'paint shaker' machine, on craigslist a while back...
No kidding. That would be cool. I guess I could just walk into the Home Depot with my cans in hand, full of water and rocks and just put them in their machines and walk away. "Hi folks, I'm just gonna borrow these for a little while." :lol:
 

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go to Lowes and pick up some muriatic (idk how its spelled) acid. worked awesome on my motorcycle tank. be careful with it though! nasty stuff. also you cant let it sit overnight, it will eat through the bottom. just put some in, and shake the can every 5-10 min for an hour or two.
 

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Get the POR-15 motorcycle tank kit. I've done m'cycle tanks with it and its really good stuff. Pretty much need a grinder to get the stuff back off again. The 1 qt can will be more then enough to do what you need. After using the cleaner and prep it will be nice an shiny inside. Then you rise it out with water and it will flash over with some surface rust which is what you want. POR-15 works best when there is some surface rust.

Do not use Kreem tank liner. I've used it before too and it sucks.
 
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