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I recently installed a transmission cooler (and trailer hitch) onto my 1994 Trooper. I have had a transmission temperature gauge in it for about 5 months and have gotten a pretty good idea of the temperature that the transmission normally runs at. In the output line from the transmission, the temperature is usually around 210F. This creeps up to 225-230F in stop and go DC beltway traffic.

I had it go to 275F (which is bad) while doing 85mph with my 33" tires on in 90 degree heat. Slowing down kept it in the safe range, but I didn't like that experience.

With the new transmission cooler (installed in the return line to the transmission), the output temperature is now below 200 almost all of the time. It will creep up to around 215 in heavy slow traffic, but since there isn't much airflow across the cooler then, there isn't a lot that I can do about it. I run 190 on the highway now, which makes me feel MUCH better.

I installed the "18,000-lbs" 3/4"x11"x7.25" stacked plate cooler, made by Hayden.

It is mounted in front of the radiator on the passenger's side. I chose to use the metal mounting brackets (bent by hand) instead of the plastic "through radiator type." One corner bolts to the headlight mount, one to the top near the hood latch, and one to the bottom of the hoot latch strut. The 4th corner uses the bracket to prevent the cooler from moving back into the radiator, but it isn't bolted to the truck, only the cooler.

-Tad
 

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Tad said:
I recently installed a transmission cooler (and trailer hitch) onto my 1994 Trooper. I have had a transmission temperature gauge in it for about 5 months and have gotten a pretty good idea of the temperature that the transmission normally runs at. In the output line from the transmission, the temperature is usually around 210F. This creeps up to 225-230F in stop and go DC beltway traffic.

I had it go to 275F (which is bad) while doing 85mph with my 33" tires on in 90 degree heat. Slowing down kept it in the safe range, but I didn't like that experience.

With the new transmission cooler (installed in the return line to the transmission), the output temperature is now below 200 almost all of the time. It will creep up to around 215 in heavy slow traffic, but since there isn't much airflow across the cooler then, there isn't a lot that I can do about it. I run 190 on the highway now, which makes me feel MUCH better.

I installed the "18,000-lbs" 3/4"x11"x7.25" stacked plate cooler, made by Hayden.

It is mounted in front of the radiator on the passenger's side. I chose to use the metal mounting brackets (bent by hand) instead of the plastic "through radiator type." One corner bolts to the headlight mount, one to the top near the hood latch, and one to the bottom of the hoot latch strut. The 4th corner uses the bracket to prevent the cooler from moving back into the radiator, but it isn't bolted to the truck, only the cooler.

-Tad
Very cool. FYI, the 2001 and 2002 Troopers have an electric fan on the Pass. side for the AC system. So you might need to find a different location instead. Cool info tad.

Cheers,
Con
 

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I also successfully installed a tranny oil cooler on my 94' Trooper. It was quite easy to do and only took about 30 minutes. I bought a large Hayden cooler from Advance Auto Parts for $58. It included just about everything needed for the installation. I did have to invest in a brass barb-to-barb connector to hook the old cooler hose into the new cooler hose. I also invested in some of the foam insulation they put around pipes/plumbing in houses. I installed the cooler in front of the a/c condenser so the house has to route down the front of the condeser, under the front frame member and between the frame member and the sway bar. I didn't want any chaffing to destroy my hoses and have catastrophic failure of the transmission lube system!

Next mission is adding the temp. guage!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It wasn't hard at all. I recommend removing the grille if you can, but I managed to get it done by loosening it. As passed along to me by a radiator shop, don't use the plastic through-radiator clips to hold the cooler. Those will eventually wear through the radiator. Use the metal brackets that come in the kit. I was able to find 3 bolts or bolt holes in the area around the radiator to attach 3 of the 4 brackets. The 4th bracket it bent so that it touches the sheet metal next to the radiator and prevents that corner of the cooler from contacting the radiator.

Be sure to follow the directions with the kit and keep the bends in the hose to a minimum. The kit will have a minimum radius too. Cover the hose where it passes through anything that is even a little bit sharp. Remember to refill your transmission when you are done.

-Tad
 

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edrhathaway said:
I'm interested in adding a "true" temp gauge to my tranny, engine, as well as a real pressure guage for my oil (2000 Trooper). Can anyone offer advice/instructions?
Find the threads, both here and on 4x4Wire, by Vovkus.

Here's a link to one where he's showing his Tranny cooler installation: http://forum.planetisuzoo.com/viewtopic ... c&start=75
 

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will go with the second one. thanks! Tad.
 
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