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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Contrary to popular belief you DO NOT need to remove the entire dash board for this repair.

Step 1
Drain coolant below just below the heater core level & disconnect the heater core hoses under the hood.
Step 2
Remove the lower section of the drivers side dash.
Step 3
Remove the fascia trim that is around the instrument cluster and center section of the dash.
Step 4
Remove the lower components found in the center section of the dash.
Step 5
Remove the center console, the ECM, the u shape metal bracket the ECM mounts to plus the steel support bracket directly above the U shape bracket that the lower center section of the dash board is attached to.
Step 6
Remove the lower heater ducting from the air box plus the heater duct that runs back to the rear heater vents.
Step 7
remove the 3 nuts that holds the air box that contains the heater core to the fire wall.
Now the air box will move towards the rear of the car in a diagonal direction towards the D/S B pillar for the first 2" after the heater tubes clear the fire wall which will require some fence, the air box will slide parallel to the fire wall and out from under the dash via the opening under the dash on the drivers side.
Step 8
Pop open the air box and install the new heater core.

It took me about 45 minutes to get to this 1/2 way point. From here all that needss to be done is to reverse the 8 steps plus, top off the coolant level.

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Shawn,
Nice write-up. Have you done one for a 1st Gen Trooper?

Mike
More than i can count. Its eaiser than the 2gen.
I may be wrong, but I think by "ever done one" he was referring to a write-up -- not a replacement. I don't have a Trooper, but I imagine a how-to for the 1st gen heater core replacement (like this one for the 2nd-gen) would be helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Shawn,
Nice write-up. Have you done one for a 1st Gen Trooper?

Mike
Heater core is on the right side of the cab. beside that you have the A/C air box (or a duct) then the control air box that contains all the diverter flaps. you must loosen the other 2 air boxes to be able to wiggle out the heater core box.
 

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Did that job on my '94 a couple summers back, went pretty much like the write-up. All I would add is: make sure to wipe off/vacuum/blow out
all the dust, dirt and debris you encounter during the job. (Don't worry; it will be there, and in large quantities...:rolleyes:) Although it isn't
necessary, I usually disconnect the battery when doing any major work under the dash just in case Murphy's looking over my shoulder...
 

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Contrary to popular belief you DO NOT need to remove the entire dash board for this repair.

Step 1
Drain coolant below just below the heater core level & disconnect the heater core hoses under the hood.
Step 2
Remove the lower section of the drivers side dash.
Step 3
Remove the fascia trim that is around the instrument cluster and center section of the dash.
Step 4
Remove the lower components found in the center section of the dash.
Step 5
Remove the center console, the ECM, the u shape metal bracket the ECM mounts to plus the steel support bracket directly above the U shape bracket that the lower center section of the dash board is attached to.
Step 6
Remove the lower heater ducting from the air box plus the heater duct that runs back to the rear heater vents.
Step 7
remove the 3 nuts that holds the air box that contains the heater core to the fire wall.
Now the air box will move towards the rear of the car in a diagonal direction towards the D/S B pillar for the first 2" after the heater tubes clear the fire wall which will require some fence, the air box will slide parallel to the fire wall and out from under the dash via the opening under the dash on the drivers side.
Step 8
Pop open the air box and install the new heater core.

It took me about 45 minutes to get to this 1/2 way point. From here all that needss to be done is to reverse the 8 steps plus, top off the coolant level.

View attachment 121988

View attachment 121989
Good pictures! Is that an old-school Uniden CB unit on the floor by the console?
 

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I may be wrong, but I think by "ever done one" he was referring to a write-up -- not a replacement. I don't have a Trooper, but I imagine a how-to for the 1st gen heater core replacement (like this one for the 2nd-gen) would be helpful.
Yep, that's what I meant. Haven't had to do one yet, knock on wood. Guess I'm lucky?

Mike
 

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I've been considering adding a coolant filter-

Are you finding them plugged with crud or leaking coolant?

Would you recommend a coolant filter add on?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I've been considering adding a coolant filter-

Are you finding them plugged with crud or leaking coolant?

Would you recommend a coolant filter add on?
Many of my cars simply sit most of the time because I dont have the time for all of them. During this time these cars receive no maintenance what-so-ever. All have the correct coolant and I have zero cooling system issues. About 15% of all the older cars that come thru my shop have the wrong coolant in them and this crud build up. The crud you are talking about are deposits formed by precipitation of silicates from with in the cooling system. It is a side effect of 2 possibilities. 1, using the wrong coolant, 2, A depletion of borate in old coolant. Coolant filters are not needed at all when the proper coolant is used in the first place. In fact all the major diesel engine manufactures such as Volvo, Detroit, Cummins & others have all done away with coolant filters.
 
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