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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I figured I'd post up some pics of my recent welding endeavors. Since it's primarily centered around building stuff for my Passport, this seemed and appropriate place. I figured we could post some pics and discus some general welding tech. Everyone feel free to post some of your own projects.

I started out playing with a Craftsman 100 AC Arc welder that a coworker of mine has. He had never used it, so I was pretty much on my own. My first project was a set of rock bars. I used the guide in the articles section and turned out a pretty decent looking set of bars. I finally really put them to the test last month in Uwharrie. I smashed them pretty good, and the rear mount of my passenger bar let go. It broke where the support connects to the plate that's welded to the frame. When I got home, I took it all the way off and saw how poorly my welds had penetrated. Some of the lack of strength can be attributed to poor fitment. I've got some improvements to the design in mind, as well as some more experience with a welder.

I decided if I was going to get serious about this stuff, I needed the proper equipment. Stick welding does not have much feneise (at least the way I do it), and it's pretty hard to do small stuff, so I decided to go with a MIG setup. After a bit of research, I decided on a Lincoln Pro MIG 135.

Which beings us to the reason for this post. I've been PM'ing and talking with Joe (Bigpappax2), and Doug (Bansil), who have been a great source of experience and advice. Thanks guys! I finally got around to taking some pics of my first project, so I figured I would post them here so I can get a little feed back.

I started out with an angle steel aquarium stand that I recently replaced, and set about building a welding cart. I'm using this to get familiar with the welder, so I'm not trying to make it perfect. My camera doesn't seem to want to take good close up shots, so this is the best I could do.

This is one of my better welds on the two legs that I had to detach and turn around.


This is a particularly bad connection on the handle. The square tube for the handle was pretty thin and didn't fit just right, so it burned through a bit.


One of the electorde hangers I bent up


Here it is, ready for paint.


Painted with the shelves in place


All loaded up


I'm trying to find a place to get some sheilding gas. The tank will go behind the welder, through the hole in the top shelf. It's nice to have a place to put all that stuff.

What do you think?

Andre
 

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Looks good,
Kinda Bling with the scroll work :p
Don't forget if you have a thicker metal and a thinner metal to concentrate on the thicker metal and "pull" the weld onto/into the thinner metal.

Oh and it must be nice to use those little wheels :p cause they wouldn't roll in gravel/dirt very good...lolololo.

If you turn the wire speed down just a hair (very little---about 1/16 of a turn it'll help keep the wire from layin' on the top surfaces so much.)

Looks good overall...
 

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You look like you are doing the same thing I was, before I watched Doug weld some. I was not keeping the wire in front of the weld and going too slow. This was allowing the weld to build up on top of itself.

I ended up watching Doug a few times and after a few more passes, I was laying flatter beads with my little 90 Amp than I thought possible.

Your picture of the weld you think is nice is pretty nice. The handle, well no one says you can't use the grinder to clean the welds up, and paint hides things well. Heck it was a learning prosess to begin with right.

It's not going to come apart, and that's the important part.

Oh, I'm also impressed with the scroll work, you really should mask off and paint those a different color, so they will stand out better :lol: :lol:

Also are you going to strap your welder down, may be a good idea. I'd not want to see you have to take that brand new thing in to get repaired.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Kinda Bling with the scroll work
Yea, the scroll work was on the stand to begin with, so I figured I'd keep it. I did have to pull one side back off in order to get the lower shelf in place.

You look like you are doing the same thing I was, before I watched Doug weld some. I was not keeping the wire in front of the weld and going too slow. This was allowing the weld to build up on top of itself.
I fugured that was the case, it's just hard to picture the propper technique when you can't see it.

Also are you going to strap your welder down, may be a good idea. I'd not want to see you have to take that brand new thing in to get repaired.
I'm planning on using a rechet strap to secure it. I'll just have to remove it to access the wire feed compartment. But how often am I going to be in there.

I have figured out that the settings specified for a particular metal thickness are really just a suggestion. I was trying some 3/16 plate yesterday, and I almost burned through it on the recomended "D" setting. but then again I might just begoing too slow. Practice makes perfect. I'm sure I'll end up with every peice of scrap in my garage welded to every other peice before I'm where I need to be.

Thanks again guys,

Andre
 

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Another cheap pc of equipment you should get is a pair of earmuffs-----
no!! not the fuzzy pink kind :shock: the cheap plastic kind for shooting etc.The ones that fit over your ears.....not!! in them.
Wear them any time you are welding verticle ,upside down or your in a weird position.These will keep spark=molten metal---out of your ears.
You may burn the outer foam and the side of your head but you'll still be able to hear yourself cuss.
I actually took the foam/rubber off of mine so they wouldn't melt.(OK,real story is,the cows ate the rubber/foam off and left the plastic---and I'm to cheap to spend $2 on a new set 8) )

Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I can think of a lot of things that are more fun than a burning cinder in the ear :? .

Thanks for the tip Doug. That's one lesson I would prefer not to learn the hard way. And I'll have to remeber to keep my ear muffs away from those darn cows :lol: :lol:

Andre
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I just got finished cutting a bunch of pieces of tube for my new and improved rock sliders. I was practicing with the types of connections I will be using. Here is the resulting mass of metal


I'm getting the hang of the settings and welding speed, and my wire control is getting better thanks to some good tips from Joe and Doug. I've still got a lot of cutting and grinding to do, but I think I'm comfortable enough to weld the real thing.

Andre
 
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