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Any suggestions on what is good? I'm getting pretty bad gas mileage and want to do everything possible to improve it some.
 

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wrxlvr said:
Any suggestions on what is good? I'm getting pretty bad gas mileage and want to do everything possible to improve it some.
I tried the Chevron Techron stuff when I was having a starting issue. Don't know if it helped any as the issue with me was a bad fuel pressure regulator.

Con
 

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I don't believe in using simple fluids to repair problems. It rarely works, often if nothing else because what comes in a consumer bottle isn't very powerful (imagine the law suit if some kid got chemical burns from being stupid).

Start with a simple tune up.
 

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If you do alot of off-roading keep a firm check on your brakes, if the pads start to run to tight on the disc it cause very bad gas milage. Most of the time you don't even realize they are to tight, (seems like they would screech or moan) but I have seen several isuzus become brake loacked and the driver never even realizes until they change the pads or caliper. Mud and dirt cause the caliper to sieze and hold the pads together too long so keep a check on the brakes
 

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Techron really works. My dad was a GM tech for 38 years and swears by it. Dump a bottle in the tank and then take the customers car for a test drive "lunch run". By the time he got back it would normally be running fine. GM even calls for it by name for some fixes. My dad is such a fanatic about it that a Chevron card is the only gas card he'll carry and he makes a point to use Chevron gas when he can. A word to the wise though. More isn't better with this stuff. Use it only with a full tank.
 

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If all you want is better gas mileage, there are several things that you can do:

Pump the tires up.

Turn off TOD

Install manual hubs

Change to synthetic gear lube

Remove the roof rack

Don't press the power button

Drive more gently.

Use the correct octane fuel.

Change your air filter.

-Tad
 

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I've been using Seafoam in my 98 Trooper for the last 10k miles. Seems to get maybe 1 mpg better with it. I have noticed that it has helped aleviate my oil consumption issue. I don't think you can go wrong using Seafoam, it has many applications...
 

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You cant go wrong with chevron techron concentrate or seafoam. They are both easy enought to get. Make sure you get the techron concentrate though. The regular stuff & Pro-guard brand supposedly dont work as well. Another thing to keep in mind, I've heard that you should switch name brands of gasoline every once in a while. Reason being- every brand of gasoline will leave it's own deposits over time. Switching brands will help curb deposits. Don't know if it really works, but it sounds like a heck of an idea!
G/luck
Joel
 

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Yes more air in the tires helps a lot! I can tell you that Seafoam helps make the v.train chatter less, my oil presure never changed when I used it, it makes the dip stick look cleaner longer after one uses it a while. I have NEVER did the vac. line thing with it, did add it to my fuel and made my 93 harder to start, broke loose some real nasty stuff that clogged up the fuel filter, hey it needed to come out I guess. Try the Seafoam, it's a real charm. As a side note, fuel consptn. is a product of factors that are but NOT limited to the engines use. The profile of the vehicle, rolling resistance ect. play huge factors in it, thats why the posing above is a real piece of simple truth, make the vehicle less of a drag, it goes further on less, of course the engine running at top effc. is also important, hey I have heard of a local police dept that clains that Tornado thing saves them $1,000's a year in fuel, I bet if they would remove the push bars and lights off those Crown Victs they drive it would even get better!!
 

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angie-darrell said:
hey I have heard of a local police dept that clains that Tornado thing saves them $1,000's a year in fuel
The "Tornado" is a good way to seperate an idiot from his money.

We have EFI engines, so how is swirling the air, long before it ever hits this huge obstruction called a throttle plate, and even longer before it hits the fuel that is injected under high pressure to atomize it near the intake valve going to help? Adding something into your intake that actually obstructs air flow is only going to make things worse.
 

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Yes I agree with you it's junk, however......I have seem on a dyno before and after results from simple"roughing" of intakes on race engines(was once a hobby of mine here in NASCAR countrty) make a great differance, it is told that the fuel has a volume of air that will/can be held, It is known that the SOONER one begins this process the MORE air can be infused. Please don't put me on the side of the TORNADO, but IN THEORY such items CAN work, I have no idea IF the one mentioned does. Again the best way to make the most of your ZU is to keep everything in order, cut drag, increase effictiveness of rolling and push the pedel on the right lightly and not too often.
 

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Well, it is killing me right now because I can not remember what the effect is called by having a roughed up intake.

But, you do not rough it up to help atomize the air. You rough it up to restrict the air flow. Yep, it is true. That air will not flow as well, but there is air inversion (maybe that was what it was called). The air near the rough area's does not flow, where the air not in contact does. And, the air slipping by air has less drag then going by polished metal. But, you have to do it right to get the proper outcome.
 

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throtle body spacers operate under the same principal as the tornado. Alot of them even have cuts to get the air to swirl. Its just getting the air to the TB faster and whith more density.
As far as fuel additives go, maybe i should start using some techron. Can you get it at any parts store? I already use the Chevron Supreme motor oil for 2reasons. Its test great in oil samples and its cheap. Oh and a third one the GM service dpt.s use the stuff too 8)
 

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A throttle body spacer increases plenum volume. The larger the plenum, the lower the torque curve is. This gives the feeling of having more power (because it creates lower RPM torque).

Those grooves cut in (like the "Power Tower" I believe) are there for a selling point.
 

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I have to disagree and agree. Yes smoother is better for INTAKE of the fuel as it allows for the fastest/fullest intake possable per the values of course, But early in the process IF one tumbles the fuel in an enviroment rich in air then the fuel will suspend the air in the fuel, this increases volume. Volume of the cyld. is directly related to output. If you will notice on high manifold dragsters one will find larger spacers between the throttle body and intake portion of the engine, the inside of these spacers are in some cases smooth, lightly rough or in extreme cases gritty, this is a point of engine tuning, certinly there are others too of course. I have built many race intakes for motorcycles from 50 cc to 500 cc and yes I was going for smooth on most of the intakes, but I had engines that were 2 stroke, their intake is not a product of valves but a product of the piston, I wanted the fuel in as fast as I could get it. In 4 strokes theory holds that volume NOT speed of intake makes the fuel burn with the most expantion, which is what one whats to push the piston down with the most force. One thing I think we all agree on is the people who build these engines built them with the know how, not this guy selling those Tornados on late night TV.
 

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Well, it sounds like you know what you are talking about, but...

A couple of things.

With an EFI engine, the fuel is *typically injected near the intake valve (preferably on the closed intake valve). So there is no time to tumble the air.

And intake length should be decided on both what RPM ranges you want (low end torque, or high end torque). Along with that, you should also calculate the best length to take advantage of the pressure waves.

Along with that, air speed is directly related to air mass inside the combustion chanmber. Maximum intake velocity is the goal. The higher the velocity, the more air that will reach the chamber before the valve closes. Since it is known that you can not reach above 100% VE, every single bit of air you can get it, makes the VE that much closer to 100%. Of course, in rare instances, you can take advantage of the pressure wave, and actually achieve 1007 or above VE (but in only a very narrow RPM range).

Forced induction doesn't actually increase VE though. It just changes what the atmosphere is that the engine breathes from. But, that is something beyond.
 

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angie-darrell said:
and.................It has all been said.
Figured I would share it with those others who didn't know :D
 
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