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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 94' Trooper that has been making a rubbing or metal grinding type of noise from the driver side front wheel. It only seem evident at lower speeds. It sounds absolutely terrible, and I'm one of those kinds of people that hate any weird noises coming from a vehicle! (Yes, Isuzu valve trains drive me INSANE!!!!).

I have taken the entire brake assembly off and inspected it. The only problem I could find was the caliper bolts that bolt to the caliper bracket were mostly locked up and the grease had broken down. I cleaned the entire assembly good with WD-40 and re-greased the bolts. They worked perfectly. I put it all back together and heard no rubbing sounds and thought everything was alright...then I drove it and found my fix wasn't really the culprit! Same old sound coming from the wheel.

Maybe I'm losing my mind, but it actually sounds like it grates more when I hit a bump. About 4 months ago I had an intermittent squealing from this wheel when turning corners and that stopped after a week. Then a few weeks later I started feeling an unusual thumping coming from this wheel -- which seemed to only thump when I was hitting small bumps. It felt like a little man with a hammer under my floor. It hadn't done this before. I'm not sure if this is at all related, but every little bit of info helps I hope.

Any guesses???

Thanks!

Michael
 

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bearings can make a really bad squealing sound when going bad, although a couple of months ago my front right brake caliper just started locking up, couldn't figure out why it was squealing so bad until a trip around the block and it almost locked the wheel up completly, something inside the caliper went south, a release valve or something
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I think I found the source of my grinding noise. I decided to jack my Trooper up and take all the wheels off. I was going to repack all the bearings, resurface the rotors and check all the brake calipers and caliper pins.

I started the truck up and put it in drive to see if I could locate the sound before starting the work - - it was coming from the back.

My rear driver side disk brake rotor was deeply scored and it appears that the caliper piston was cocked sideways and rusted into place (even with the boot on it!). The pads were gone and it was nothing but metal. Hopefully there's enough left on my rotor to have it resurfaced. I hate to have to replace one!

I can't get the caliper piston to move. I've tried cranking it back into it's bore with a c clamp and I tried blowing it out with compressed air -- I only succeeded in making a fine mist of brake fluid that probably covered the entire surface of my vehicle! I had to wash it in the garage on jack stands!

So, looks like it's new caliper time. It just keeps getting cheaper and cheaper!
 

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Rotors are relatively inexpensive, but you're going to have to buy a pair for the rear. Hopefully it isn't scored that bad... Then again if it is scored as deep as you make it sound you might waste more money on grinding it down this time only to have to buy brand new ones very soon!

I'm thinking that you have mechanical damage to the caliper assembly, and I agree that you should replace it.

Doesn't the '94 trooper have that piston that needs to be rotated like in the '99 Rodeo? That I'm not sure about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The machine shop is able to resurface one of the rear rotors, the other scored one is shot and has to be replaced -- I think it costs $33 for a new one, which isn't so bad -- I'm sure I could find a better price somewhere else, but when you get done running to every store in town you've wasted more in gas than you've saved on the cheaper part!

A new rear caliper is $74 (I believe that it's loaded and ready to go) -- so that's not so bad either!

I don't know about rotating the piston. I did a brake job on my wife's 97 Rodeo and the book said to rotate the pistons but I didn't do it. I just cranked them back into the bore with a c clamp and put the new pads in. What does the rotation of the piston accomplish????

I'm having new studs pressed in because some idiot broke one old one on each of the front tires and the others are beginning to look tired -- that costs about $2 a piece just for the pressing!!! That's rather expensive, but it's good to get it done and over with for peace of mind and safety's sake.

The front rotors had some scoring too, so they're getting turned as well.
costs:
Turning rotors 3 x $10 = $30
New caliper assembly = $74
New rear rotor = $33
Stud pressing = $24
Studs = $20
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$181
Grand total not including new brake pads:

That and new bump stops and I'll be Troopin' again!

BIG QUESTION == The front brake pads are practically brand new, but the rotors were scored and are being resurfaced -- should I use the old pads or replace them????
 

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How are the rear rotors removed? Do they just slide off after the calibers are removed? There appears to be a lot of rust and removing them may be a pain. Thanks. 92 Pickup 4x4 3.1
 

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BIG QUESTION == The front brake pads are practically brand new, but the rotors were scored and are being resurfaced -- should I use the old pads or replace them????
Replace them, this will extend the life of your rotors. Save the old brake pads. When your new pads wear out, put in the saved old pads.
 
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