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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright, I am a total newbie, not only to this sight, but to engine work as well. I recently bought a 2002 Rodeo Sport 3.2L with a rod knock and want to swap the engine myself. (I was looking at getting a shop to do it, but I was quoted 1800 to swap the old engine for the new and I feel that's a bit pricey). I am pretty mechanically inclined, but I have never done anything more involved than a suspension lift.

So, before I get into this, I have a few questions. Are there any special tools I will need as far as diagnostics, timing, or compression goes? I have your basic garage setup with hand tools and hoist, but is that all I will need? and the engine I'm picking up is an '02 with no problems.

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks in advance!!
 

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Since no one else has responded, first make absolutely certain it is in fact a rod knock and not the timing belt tensioner. Plenty of information on here about the tensioner noise and it has fooled more then one in to thinking it was a rod knock.
Aside from that, you should be able to accomplish the swap with little or no special tools. If you have high blood pressure or anger management issues you may be better off farming the work out as these can be frustrating to work on and accessibility of some bolts and such will cause a rise in blood pressure. If you feel up to the task, stock up on band-aides, ratchet extensions, and u-joints (or I've heard them called wobble joints) for your socket set. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have done quite a bit of research and the knock sounds like it is coming from the rear of the engine, it just gets louder over 3k rpms, and there are metal flakes in the oil. So I'm pretty sure it's a rod.

I will go through my tool box tomorrow and start looking into expanding my socket accessories. And wrenching is somewhat of a stress reliever for me, so I dont think I'll get too hot.

thanks for the reply
 

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It's a good idea to put the front on jack stands, pull the wheels and the splash guards and go through that way for several things like A/C compressor and exhaust manifolds. When pulling second gen engines, I like to unbolt the manifolds from the engine and leave them in the truck. They will spread far enough to clear the studs and you won't have to mess with the studs that like to break.
 
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