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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The last time I got the CO2 tank filled, the guy asked me why I didn't use Nitrogen instead?

He said that for $21, I could get a 60lb tank filled with nitrogen vs. paying
$20 to fill my 20lb tank. He said the nitrogen was better for air tools (less moisture) and that the temperature in the tires wouldn't fluctuate as much (meaning a more consistent PSI).

Also, with CO2 when it is released rapidly, as in filling tires, it tends to freeze the air line whereas with Nitrogen, I don't believe this happens.

The only thing I can't figure out (once again) :lol: is which tank will fill up more tires/last longer and why? :?

I'll have to find out tomorrow morning the initial cost to buy a 60lb tank of Nitrogen also. :wink:
 

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You get about 1.5x more volume of nitrogen for the same weight of gas.
 

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Van said:
The last time I got the CO2 tank filled, the guy asked me why I didn't use Nitrogen instead?

He said that for $21, I could get a 60lb tank filled with nitrogen vs. paying
$20 to fill my 20lb tank. He said the nitrogen was better for air tools (less moisture) and that the temperature in the tires wouldn't fluctuate as much (meaning a more consistent PSI).

Also, with CO2 when it is released rapidly, as in filling tires, it tends to freeze the air line whereas with Nitrogen, I don't believe this happens.

The only thing I can't figure out (once again) :lol: is which tank will fill up more tires/last longer and why? :?

I'll have to find out tomorrow morning the initial cost to buy a 60lb tank of Nitrogen also. :wink:
Nitrogen is the preferred gas for filling tires. Many if not most of the claims made about it are bogus,but it IS drier. They say its better than air because it causes less oxidation damage to your tires,but Ive never had a tire fail from that. The tread wears out first.

Unless your doing carrier landings and worried about your tires igniting from the friction and setting your magnesium alloy wheels on fire,you don't NEED nitrogen. (I don't do carrier landings with my Rodeo anymore as I worry that the arresting hook could fail due to frame rust. :lol:) On the other hand,if you have to have a portable gas supply to fill tires,nitrogen seems to be the gas to use. I would be worried about using CO2. CO2 doesn't so much dissolve in water,but instead for carbonic acid. I would be worried what this might do to my rims. Nitrogen is not only inert but its drier. While they promote this as a way to prevent corrosion, I have never had a wheel fail due to corrosion so long as it was actually ON a car with a good tire on it. (Ive seen spares fail when they went flat,sucked up some water and then were thrown in a trunk and were left for 5 years. My assumption was,the hole would not hold pressure but was more or less sealed at 0psi,keeping the water in.

Essentially,my personal opinion is,Nitrogen for most of us is just a scam and has no practical use in our tires,except in your application it seems to be perfect.
 

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You get way more then 1.5 times the volume of co2 vs nitrogen. We use both for the kind of work I do. Nitrogen is usually charged as just a gas (3-5k psi in the tank) and co2 is charged as a liquid. Thats why pretty much everyone uses co2 for OBA setups instead of nitrogen. Costs about the same to fill.

$21 is a lot for nitrogen. We get a discounted rate at work since its commercial and we use a lot but we pay $14 for an exchange of nitrogen and $12 for exchange of co2. I would figure about $18 for a co2 refill for a non discounted rate.
 

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mallen said:
Many if not most of the claims made about it are bogus.
amen to that. PV = nRT
 

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Nitrogen is basically a highly compressed cylinder in gas form.

CO2 is stored in liquid form. It takes very little liquid to make a large quantity of gas. Much larger quantity of total gas in a 20# CO2 bottle vs the 60# Nitrogen bottle. This is the major advantage of using CO2.

The other advantage is safety. I'd much rather have 800 pounds of liquid in a cylinder vs 5000 pounds of gas.

Joe
 

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Sags said:
I inflate my tires with 78% nitrogen blend, and it's free! :D
Does that local station have a 50mi hose, or do you have a baby compressor?

~psguardian
 

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psguardian said:
Sags said:
I inflate my tires with 78% nitrogen blend, and it's free! :D
Does that local station have a 50mi hose, or do you have a baby compressor?

~psguardian
If I'm going out and think I might air down the tires, I carry a 10 gallon compressed air tank. If I fill the tank up from the compressor at home to 160psi, it's enough to air up 4 tires (30" x 16s, but I bet it would do 32s as well) from 12 to 35psi. I do have a battery compressor but it is very, very slow, I carry it all the time just for emergencies.

I was just being a little bit sarcastic before, I totally get the advantages of on board air for the hardcore trail guys. Honestly nitrogen would make me a little nervous just because of the pressure, if I where to build on board air, I think a permanent compressor or Co2 would be best.

100% nitrogen does have some advantages over atmosphere, there are several good reasons why airliners and business jets use it, none of which really apply to earth-bound vehicles. So unless your a hardcore track day racer who requires precision inflation to the tenth of a pound, I don't think you would ever notice.
 

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No worries sags, I was playing along... Or trying to. I live 5 min from the local AirGas hub so when time comes for OBA all i'll need is money lol.

I did picture a gas station hose snaking through the fiest while typing out that last one, lol funny stuff.

~psguardian
 

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Just out of curiosity.

Why do you guys seem to prefer a compressed gas or liquid tank for on board air, over a mini compressor whether electric or engine driven?

I know that a compressed tank of Co2 or nitrogen would be faster inflating, but is seems to me like a compressor would be much less bulky and cheaper if your using it a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for all the answers guys... I'll be keeping my CO2 tank. :D

Sags, to answer your ? from my perspective... I like to have backup plans just in case. I have the 20lb. air tank, an ARB compressor (under the hood) and a portable 12v compressor... one of those should work. :lol:

I also use the OBA for the air tools and as you stated, it's a lot faster to fill up tires... what :?, you need another 15-20 minutes to fill your tires?

I use it for cleaning out the dust from trail riding and to cool me down when it's hot outside (non functioning A/C). :lol:

Having a "blast" (90-120psi) of air comes in handy when cleaning clogged hoses also.

Last but not least... it cools down beverages pretty fast when used properly. :drunken:
 

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Just a heads up. When I was into paintball, we either used co2 of nitrogen. The co2 tanks did not need to be pressure tested after their purchase date (although it was recommended). The nitrogen tank had to be hydro tested every 3(?) years. I believe they would not fill up a nitrogen tank if it was over the test date.
 

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dryvr12 said:
Just a heads up. When I was into paintball, we either used co2 of nitrogen. The co2 tanks did not need to be pressure tested after their purchase date (although it was recommended). The nitrogen tank had to be hydro tested every 3(?) years. I believe they would not fill up a nitrogen tank if it was over the test date.
I used to play collegiate level paintball at tournies all over the mountain west, a few fields used pure nitrogen, most just used compressed air (72% nitrogen). I could honestly never tell the difference, with a decent regulators it shouldn't matter. As for hydro testing just look for the DOT code on the top, some are 3 yrs, some are 5, some big tanks are 10 or 15. It all depends on the kind of tank. I had 2 4500 psi paintball tanks one was a aluminum/carbon filament wound one, it had a 3yr hydro date. The other was straight aluminum and had a 5 yr hydro. I knew lots of players with out of date tanks though, at most tournies and fields we used the air was self-serve, so nobody bothered. I did blow a burst disc (5000 psi) on my tank once, filled it, and left it sitting in the sun on a cold day, that was exciting.
 
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