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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took possession of my '88 Trooper II this past October, it had been in Florida with my dad (long story) for the past four years. On two occasions, two weeks ago and last night, I experienced clutch slippage when there was a severe drop in temper :wink: ature. After the first time I simply bled the slave and everything was as it should be. The second time wad last night but I haven't had time to do anything. I put in a 14 hour day and don't have time after work go do anything. I'm assuming because it happened twice, two weeks apart that the cylinder is bad. After bleeding it the first time I took it up a steep hill in third gear, lugging motor but the clutch would not slip.
Has anyone experienced this problem? I've ordered a new slave.

Sandhog
 

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Might be the slave but I suspect it's the master cylinder. Probably so crapped up it's not releasing. Replace both at the same time. Bleed well and live happily ever after. The master is a PITA to get to due to tight spaces but it can be done.
 

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The severe drop in temperature prior to failure and the fact that brake fluid absorbs water makes me at least wonder if the fluid is contaminated with water?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I spoke this evening with the guy who bled the slave the first time it was slipping after a temperature drop. Bleeding did the trick, right afterwards we did a steep hill, slow speed, in third gear and there was no slipping. He exclaimed "the clutch is good". I told him about the slipping happening again Sunday night and now he has changed his tune and tells me he's sure it's the clutch. He doesn't think changing out the master and slave will remedy my situation. What say you?
 

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How many miles are on the truck? Is it the original clutch? A stock 2.6 clutch is usually good for 100-150k. Temperature shouldn't affect clutch holding that much. Or the master slave either. Are the master and slave original? if so they are probably ready for replacement anyway. 25 year old rubber parts inside. Both can be done for under $100 usually if you do it yourself. If you do that and it still slips you can chalk it up to needed anyway and then move on to the clutch. If it fixes it for a while it's a lot cheaper and less work than dropping the trans to do a clutch.

A proper clutch job on a 2.6 requires in parts if you do everything I would.
A new clutch, pressure plate, throw out bearing.
A new pilot bearing for the crankshaft end.
8 new flywheel bolts. Isuzu does not recommend reusing them.
A new rear main seal for the engine.
Also a new front seal and bearing retainer gasket for the transmission. Crazy not to do it while you are in there.

Have your stock flywheel resurfaced at a machine shop. It is better steel than a cheap replacement flywheel.

I'm going to be doing this soon and will write it up with pics here.
viewtopic.php?f=15&t=56442
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My '88 Trooper II has 53K original miles on her. I bought her 4 years ago with 11,800 miles so we'll assume everything is original.I'll be stopping at the parts store after work go pick up the new slave and master cylinders. I'll do the install this weekend and provide an update after that. Thanks for the valuable info on parts replacement.

Sandhog
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I stated earlier that I thought the master cylinder was original but now I have my doubts. Yesterday (1/21/12) I installed a new master and slave cylinders. The top nut on the master was a 12mm and it took quite a while (hours) to find out that the bottom nut was a 13mm. What a headache that was.
Before removing the master, I soaked the fluid out of the reservoir using paper towels. When I got down too the last ¾ of an inch of fluid, it was black, looked like old (dirty) motor oil. Of course it was like that from the master all the way down to the slave cylinder.
I got everything installed and proceeded too bleed the system. With the old cylinders the clutch engaged almost at the top of the stroke, now (with new) it engages about 4" or less from the floor and the pedal return is not snappy and crisp like before.
Does the adjustment down at the clevis have anything to offer?
After my current dilemma is resolved I will move on to replace the timing belt and water punp. After that the Trooper will receive a new clutch assembly.
Come springtime I'll be doing the '92 and up brake upgrade. I have a website bookmarked that sells drilled rotors for the Trooper II. Close on the heels of the brake upgrade will be heavy duty torsion bars.
I want to thank you for being so helpful. I'm not a mechanic but I refuse go pay someone go do work I can do. I owned the same Harley-Davidson for 23 years, there wasn't anything I couldn't do mechanically. I've had that motor put pulled the cylinders, split the cases and pressed out the fly wheels to accomplish the task at hand. I'll admit though that electrics are not my forte.
Again, thank you for all your help.

Sandhog
(Michael J. Artwich)
 
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