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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's 'Smiley Story' time again!
(Ya might wanna go take a potty break, and maybe refill that coffee cup, first ;) )

I picked-up a set of Genuine OEM Brake Pads from Ron, at ISUZUwharrie, in April, knowing that the pads on the Trooper were approaching the end of their life cycle. --- When I first got the Trooper from Erik, it had the absolute best brakes I've ever felt in an Isuzu, bar none - the pedal was quite firm, amazingly smooth, and it engaged the brakes almost instantaneously (no doubt, thanks to the Indy4x HD SS Brake Lines, front, rear, and center-rear). --- Well, a couple of 4-wheeling trips, a set of 35-inch tires, and several thousand pizza delivery miles later, and I started hearing a rather disconcerting sound coming from the rear... not the typical 'squeeeeeee' either; no, rather more intense, like bad wheel bearings, actually (which, honestly, I considered to be the more likely source of the problem) - but I knew the pads had to be nearly gone at this point, so I figured a brake job would be about as good a place to start as any, sooooooooooo...

After lazily squandering-away the first two days of my three-day holiday weekend, come Monday the 4th, while practically every other person in town was grilling hamburgers and hotdogs; rather than do likewise, *I* decided that it was a good time to get busy and do something about those brakes.

Step One:
Find (no small task) my light-weight silver tarp, so as to provide some shade from the blazing sun, since I don't have a garage.

Step Two:
Rig said tarp (also, no small task - since there aren't any nearby trees upon which to anchor it). --- I ended-up putting one side of it on top of the Shasta camper, spanning over the Trooper, and attaching the other end to the SLX.

Step Three:
Catch my breath, and drink a large glass of water. --- It was HOT and quite SUNNY (two things that I am not terribly fond of, actually - my predominately Scottish blood much prefers cool, overcast conditions).

Step Four:
(Finally!) Start-in on those brakes. --- I jacked & jack standed the rear axle, and removed the driver's side rear tire. --- Then I readied my ¾-inch socket wrench and breaker bar with the appropriate 14mm & 17mm sockets, and started breaking the bolts loose...

Step Five:
After admiring the unbelievably Georgia rust-free surfaces, I was quite surprised to find the lower lock pin to be so difficult to break loose. --- I had to swap the 14mm socket onto the breaker bar, and tap at it with my 3-pound BFH... and tap... and tap... and TAP...

Step Six:
Cuss like an Australian sailor! --- Turns out, that tap-tap-tapping became bam-bam-bamming before it finally broke... and by 'broke,' I mean, BROKE - as in: snapped in two - with the other half of the pin still lodged deep inside of the cage.

Step Seven:
I just can't imagine that Erik did so himself, so I am going to assume that some 'trained service technician' was the one who (a) installed the Guide Pin and Lock Pin in the reverse positions, with the Guide in the Lock hole, and the Lock in the Guide hole, and (B) failed to lubricate either one of them, whatsoever. --- Soooooooooooooo, now what? --- Well, since it was a holiday, and since I didn't have the funds to purchase the required parts (even if I could find them)... as it turns out, I just happen to own another Isuzu - one that hasn't budged in quite a while - so it probably wouldn't miss a brake cage and pin (at least, not for a little while)... Soooooooooooooooooo, I resigned myself to the fact that I had to go 'Rob Peter to Pay Paul,' so to speak.

Sub-Step One:
Unwrap the Rodeo from its cocoon...

Sub-Step Two:
Dig through the back and find my old jack and jack stands...

Sub-Step Three:
Remove the rear driver's side tire, and inspect the brake assembly... EEEEEW, rust! --- Lots and lots of RUST!

Sub-Step Four:
Pray. --- Compared to the brakes on the Trooper (which were nearly in pristine condition, visually, anyway), the brakes on the Rodeo looked like something that had been stored in brine, like some sort of rust-growing experiment gone awry... thoroughly caked and flaking.

Sub-Step Five:
Muster the courage to break those bolts (preferably, without actually BREAKING them!) --- Turned out, since I had used a healthy slathering of synthetic axle grease on them, the bolts themselves turned without any fuss (YEA!), and I had the required replacement parts in my hands in no time.

Sub-Step Six:
Replace the Rodeo's rear tire - remove the Jack and Jack Stand.

Step Eight:
Install the "new" cage and pin, along with the Trooper's caliper, in conjunction with the brand-spanking new factory pads - making sure to lube-the-snot-out-of the Guide and Lock Pins.

Step Nine:
Cast an eye skyward, in response to the cool gust of wind that was raising my makeshift shelter, and see if I could determine the source of the distant rumbling I'd just heard. --- Turned out, according to the cell phone call I received from Kathy (placed from inside the house, just 40-or-so-feet away); the Weather Channel was posting a crawl at the bottom of the screen, warning of a Severe Thunderstorm, with 60+ mph winds, and the possibility of quarter-sized hail. --- Great.

Step Ten:
Repeat Step Four on the passenger side rear. --- And guess what...

Step Eleven:
Repeat Step Five (only, this time, with at least twice as many expletives). --- Yep, reversed pins and no lubrication, again... But, before I could even think about going back over to the Rodeo for another organ donation, the torrent was upon me. --- Kathy called again, this time asking why I was still up on the hill, under the tarp, instead of in the house, where it was safe. --- Well, someone had to stay up there and prevent the tarp from blowing into the next county, didn't they? --- And what a ride it was! --- For a while there, I experienced something akin to parasailing, with one corner of the tarp on the ground, with my entire body weight sitting upon it, wrapped around my back - with the wind lifting me 6 to 8 inches off the ground!

Step Twelve:
Once the worst of the storm had past, I got busy again... repeating Steps Seven and Eight, including all of Sub-Steps One through Six.

All-in-all, it took me roughly six times as long to do just the rear brakes as it should have to do all four corners... and, since it took so bloody long, just for the rears, I conceded defeat, and went inside for a well-deserved icy-cold beverage. --- The fronts will simply have to wait for another day... hopefully, a far less arduous and eventful one!

The good news is, the noise is gone, and my brakes are back to feeling strong again, just like before... so, I guess that's a check mark in the Win Column for now.

And so, Friends... that's how you do a brake job, when your brakes break, and you're broke :lol:

Cheers!
Smiley
 

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Glad I had just peed and filled my coffee mug. :lol:

Good story :)
 

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Did the wind blow and knock the 12' board out from under the tarp :thefinger:

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.glad to see a smiley post :mrgreen:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Bansil said:
Did the wind blow and knock the 12' board out from under the tarp :thefinger:
:p :p :p :p :p

"And kids, that's how that dent came to be on the side of Momma Turtle's camper."
 

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Wonderful story. I never knew a simple brake job could be so entertaining...

Next time take video!
 

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Great post! :toothy2: :toothy2:
 

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:laughing4: :laughing5:

so uhh....does it stop on a dime?
 

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No pics? I was hoping there would atleast be pics of the makeshift shelter.
 

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A chapter that will be included in the future book:

The Wit and Wisdom of Smiley :?:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
94Rodayo4x4 said:
so uhh....does it stop on a dime?
The answer to this question, it seems, was a topic of great interest to several area motorists this week -- each one of them taking turns performing a myriad of stunt maneuvers that tested not only my brakes, but my patience, vocabulary, and goodwill toward fellow man (and white-haired old ladies).

The new brakes passed with flying colors......... me; well, I aced the vocabulary test, anyhow :violent3:

Bullitt930 said:
No pics? I was hoping there would atleast be pics of the makeshift shelter.
Plausible deniability... With no photos, there's no way of ever knowing if it looked as ramshackle and aesthetically displeasing as Miss Kathy thought (and said... repeatedly).

:lol:
 
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