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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
there is a wild rose plant in the lot next to my work, but the roots are on the other side of the fence under a woodpile. I would love to bring this thing home with me. how can I grow it from a cutting without being able to get to the roots?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
:?: :scratch:
 

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I've done it sortta this way::

1 Take a few cuttings from a rose bush by selecting stems that are straight, free of black-spot fungus and have at least four or five leaves. You will make your cuts just below one of the leaf nodes.
2 Cut the stems with a sharp pair of bypass pruners, which will leave an open wound at the end of each cutting. Note that this differs from the normal pruning of a rose bush, which requires anvil pruners. The cuttings should have a total length of around 12 inches.
3 Make a small vertical slit at the base of the new stem of each cutting, which will help to facilitate the rooting process. This cut should be no more than half an inch long.
4 Remove the bottom leaves of the cuttings so that the stems can be freely inserted into the ground.
5 Put the cuttings in a sealed plastic bag, and place them in a cool, dry place, such as a refrigerator, for at least eight hours. This will preserve the moisture inside the stems as the cut ends heal and close.
6 Remove the rose stems from the refrigerator, and dip the ends into rooting hormone powder, which can be found at any garden-supply store or nursery.
7 Prepare the soil where the cuttings will be planted. Use a cultivator to mix up the soil, and then gently stick the cuttings about halfway into the ground. You may want to add sphagnum peat moss or vermiculite to keep the soil from becoming too wet, causing fungus and rot. Water thoroughly.
8 Allow at least a month for the rooting to take hold, depending upon the climate.

When new leaves appear, gently pull on the cuttings to determine whether roots have sprouted. If you feel resistance, then the transplant was a success.
 
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