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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm putting a new Condensor in my 94 Trooper..mine has a leak. Can anyone give me any step by step on this? Do I have to remove the bumper? Any help would be appreciated..thanks
 

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Since it has a leak I'm guessing all the refrigerant is gone now so you wont need to have it evacuated.

Remove grill and bumper, unbolt line connections (one to an aluminum line and one to the receiver/dryer), probably have to swap the condenser fan to the new one if yours has a condenser fan, unbolt condenser and bolt new one in. Replace o-rings on the lines you removed, probably a good idea to replace all the o-rings in the system while you have it empty since its cheap and will guard against any other leaks. You can get o-rings from the a/c section of any parts store, they are green. Get 2 variety size packs so you have enough of each size. Might consider replacing the filter/dryer. Once its all back together, take it to a shop to have a vacuum pulled on the system then recharge it.
 

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Don't have a shop pull a vacuum. The system will suck air in as soon as they disconnect their equipment. You need to charge it at the same time, before the equipment is disconnected. So that means, if the shop pulls a vacuum, they should charge it. Better if you get a vacuum pump and do it yourself. The larger Autozone stores have vacuum pumps in their free "loan a tool" program. You will need your own manifold gauges.

It's best to pull a vacuum, close off the valves, and let it stand for a while. If will hold a vacuum, it's ready to charge. If not, repeat the process several times. It may just be boiling the moisture out, and you NEED to do that. If you can't eventually get it to hold a vacuum, don't waste money on refrigerant until you've found the leak.

Jack
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I just replaced it and charged it with two cans of freon..it's cheap..but is there any problems that might occur by not pulling the vacuum?
 

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Bonebag said:
I just replaced it and charged it with two cans of freon..it's cheap..but is there any problems that might occur by not pulling the vacuum?
Yes... Eventually acid will form and ruin your compressor.

If you want your a/c lasting longer than the summer (because you WILL ruin your compressor if you keep running it) I would suggest evacuating it ASAP and replacing the receiver/drier as well. PULL A VACUUM FIRST! About 30 minutes should do the trick.
 

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It also wont work worth a crap if you dont pull a vacuum. With air in the system the pressures will be way off and air is a terrible refrigerant.

The window is just a sight glass. On older system you could charge till there were no bubbles and it would be close enough. Doesnt work with 134a systems though, when properly charged they still have bubbles.
 

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Gizmo42 said:
Since it has a leak I'm guessing all the refrigerant is gone now so you wont need to have it evacuated.

Remove grill and bumper, unbolt line connections (one to an aluminum line and one to the receiver/dryer), probably have to swap the condenser fan to the new one if yours has a condenser fan, unbolt condenser and bolt new one in. Replace o-rings on the lines you removed, probably a good idea to replace all the o-rings in the system while you have it empty since its cheap and will guard against any other leaks. You can get o-rings from the a/c section of any parts store, they are green. Get 2 variety size packs so you have enough of each size. Might consider replacing the filter/dryer. Once its all back together, take it to a shop to have a vacuum pulled on the system then recharge it.
Im going to add something. Gizmo is probably right,but assume he is wrong and that the lines are pressurized. Wear safety goggles. Not the kind that you would wear to the shooting range,but the kind that seal around the sides with the little plastic vent inserts. The kind that are sort of like sunglasses with side sheilds are for impacts. The kind that seal around your face are for chemicals and will provide more protection for getting a blast of freon in the face,although you could STILL get your eyeballs frozen,so just because you have the safety glasses on don't think your invulnerable.

Now Im not an AC expert or any sort of expert really,so if I make some mistake her someone point it out and call me an idiot. Not being an expert,I guess I would be making a mistake doing this myself and someone could yell at me and call me stupid and say I'm doing something dangerous. Still,Ill be honest. I would do this myself. However,I would try to take some precautions. Personally I would wear a face shield over those goggles. (yes,I have one,but if I didn't,I would wear my welding helmet over the goggles) I would wear heavy gloves,welding gloves would be good. I would take a damp rag and put it over the joint,and crack the seal. Water has a fairly high heat of fusion and my hope is the water in the rag will give up its heat to the freon while not dropping below 0 degrees itself and provide a barrier a dry rag might not. (I'm thinking that freon gas might just blow through a dry rag without appreciably changing the temperature of the freon while the damp rag,at least at first,will heat the freon to 0 degrees while it freezes. yes,I know the water will transfer the heat to my hands better,but that's why I said damp,not dripping,my gloves should remain dry.

(ok,well today I was cutting metal with an angle grinder and I took the guard off to get it in somewhere,then didn't put the guard back and 20 minutes later sliced my finger down to the muscle. Of course as soon as I did it I realized that while it might have been an acceptable risk to cut that one part without the guard,I should have put it back on. So,I might not actually pay attention to my own advice servicing an ac system,however,as the paramedics were leading me blind,toward the ambulance with frozen eyeballs,I would be thinking,Its my own damn fault,just like the burns I got from doing that one weld without the gloves,or the several cuts Ive had from forgetting the guard on the grinder,I knew I should have assume that it was full,and wore proper PPE but I didnt)

I do have a question,did 94 use R134a? If its R12,I guess its time to convert,or join the big knock down drag out over propane as a refrigerant. LOL (Im not a fan,but there are those that will argue with me)
 

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Wet rag wont make any appreciable difference over a dry one other then it will be heavier and less likely to blow off. But will increase the chances of getting more moisture in the system. Refrigerant is extremely cold at atmospheric pressure when coming out of a small opening like a leak or pressed schrader valve (works the same as the orifice/expansion valve in the system) and will freeze a wet rag in seconds.

You can just take the cap off the low side schrader valve (the blue one) and push the valve core in with a small screw driver for a second to see if there is anything in the system. It wont hurt you for that quick of a spurt if you get any on you for some reason. I get blasted by refrigerant all the time (I'm an HVAC tech) when pulling my gauges off if the low loss fitting doesnt hold which happens some times. Havent been frost bitten/injured yet. I move my hands away pretty quick though when it happens.
 

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Gizmo42 said:
Wet rag wont make any appreciable difference over a dry one other then it will be heavier and less likely to blow off. But will increase the chances of getting more moisture in the system. Refrigerant is extremely cold at atmospheric pressure when coming out of a small opening like a leak or pressed schrader valve (works the same as the orifice/expansion valve in the system) and will freeze a wet rag in seconds.

You can just take the cap off the low side schrader valve (the blue one) and push the valve core in with a small screw driver for a second to see if there is anything in the system. It wont hurt you for that quick of a spurt if you get any on you for some reason. I get blasted by refrigerant all the time (I'm an HVAC tech) when pulling my gauges off if the low loss fitting doesnt hold which happens some times. Havent been frost bitten/injured yet. I move my hands away pretty quick though when it happens.
Honestly,they talk about frost bite of skin alot,but Ive never been worried about that. It takes a lot to freeze a significant amount of tissue and Im not dumb enough to stick my hand in a bucket of liquid nitrogen. (We have all sorts of stupid rules about that at work by someone who has never actually worked with it,you can actually poor it over your hand and in fact it was a demo we used to do in grad school for the undergrads leading into discussions if heat) I am careful of my eyes though as a little damage to the surface can cause a great deal of problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The 94 is 134A...

I'm understanding that the ingredient in canned air..the kind you clean your computer with..is R134A..

not terribly dangerous unless sprayed into your eye directly..or inhaled..inhaled is bad.
 

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Bonebag said:
I'm understanding that the ingredient in canned air..the kind you clean your computer with..is R134A..

not terribly dangerous unless sprayed into your eye directly..or inhaled..inhaled is bad.
Most canned air now is R-152a (Difluoroethane) which is similar to R-134a (Tetrafluoroethane) with less "global warming potential". R-134a is being phased out in cars in EU apparently and is restricted in some states now for containers under 15 lbs.

134a can cause frost bite pretty quickly. At atmospheric pressure its around -30 deg when shooting through an orifice (leak, schrader valve, etc.) a couple seconds wont hurt you but longer then that and you will have frost bite.
 
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