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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to install a '99 Rodeo auto transmission. Much difficulty. The transmission is 2nd hand. Just couldn't get it to mate up to engine. The bellhousing kept hitting the flywheel.
Then I found it. Appears to have been dropped. Yeah, I know, ... why didn't I see this beforehand?...

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The bolt lug and adjacent feature were severely cracked. They were pushed in, toward the flywheel.
I attempted an "adjustment" cold, which may not have been a great idea, and both features broke off.
So, I removed the bellhousing from transmission and set it onto the engine and "now" it mates fine. Just missing a lug...
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I set the lug in place and bolted it on. It's not a perfect fit as the housing appears to still be slightly deformed. But it does clear the flywheel. There is a gap where it was cracked.
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Repair (?): TIG is an option, but I don't have one. And weld shop is probably $$$ + time. I've got oxy/acetylene and some Alumiweld. I've had success with that on smaller cast aluminum parts.
Has anyone ever successfully tried to repair a broken bellhousing?
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Run It (?): Toss the bits in the trash and keep on truckin' with the install ?
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Replace (?): Scrap it and head to the salvage yard. Spend a half day or more living with the mole people as I dig out a transmission from underneath a car. Perhaps get lucky and find a donor with the engine missing ..?
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Looking for input...
 

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The Honda/Isuzu part number for a 99 4l30e Converter ("Bell") Housing is 8-96041-653-0
Fits 98-02 Rodeo/Passport/Amigo/Rodeo Sport and probably 98-99 Trooper. The price is about $280 bucks. Your best option imho is find another 4L30e.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Don't sugar coat it B. Tell me the truth....:oops:
Ouch. That's a tough pill to swallow.
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Not enough kibbles in the kitty for that right now.
Here's what I plan to do- as the converter housing is off, I'm going to fab some jigs and get the broken lug as close to the engine hole pattern as possible. Then, Alumiweld it. If it is indeed scrap, then there's really nothing to lose.
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On a side note, when I removed the converter housing, the "guts" wiggled out.
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I tried to gently slide them back in, wiggle wiggle, but nothing.
I've been watching Curmudgeon Transmission and his video on 4L30e disassembly. Oh wow. He worked for a solid 30-minutes separating, de-pinning, pulling, sliding,... clutch plates, bolts flying. Whoa! I have to say after watching that (and the assembly video), I'm a little nervous when parts start coming out.
I'm thinking I should set it on it's tail and gently try to wiggle it back into place. (?)
 

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I've watched the same video, I couldn't believe how complicated. I wonder if Buster28 has ever done one.

Where are you located? Maybe there is a 4L30E nearby?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Bummer. I set the transmission up on wood blocks on its tail. Which is probably how I should've taken the converter housing off. Didn't rotate the pump, but just wiggled it until it dropped in. I thought it was good. Installed housing, all bolts lined up, no issues. Righted transmission and checked output shaft rotation and mode selector. Locked in Park, but freely spins in all other gears. Doh!
 

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Bummer. I set the transmission up on wood blocks on its tail. Which is probably how I should've taken the converter housing off. Didn't rotate the pump, but just wiggled it until it dropped in. I thought it was good. Installed housing, all bolts lined up, no issues. Righted transmission and checked output shaft rotation and mode selector. Locked in Park, but freely spins in all other gears. Doh!
The 4L30e is a three speed transmission with an overdrive section retrofitted to the front of the transmission to provide a 4th gear capability.

The only gears inside the transmission section are the planetary gear set, this gear set produces the Reverse, 1st, 2nd and 3rd gear ratios. The overdrive section section also has a planetary gear set, it produces a 1:1 ratio when the transmission planetary gear set is in R, 1st, 2nd, 3rd gear and a 0.723 :1 ratio when the transmission planetary gear set is producing the 3rd gear ratio and 4th gear is commanded.

There are three friction clutches, a friction band and a unidirectional mechanical clutch located in the transmission section. There are two friction clutches and a unidirectional mechanical clutch located in the overdrive section section.

The tail-shaft is connected to the transmission planetary gear set. The torque converter turbine shaft connects to the overdrive section section planetary gear set. For the transmission planetary gear set to produce an output ratio the Reverse clutch or the brake band or the brake band and the 2nd clutch or the 2nd clutch and the 3rd clutch must be applied. Additionally the Overrun clutch or Overdrive clutch must be applied to connect the TC turbine shaft to the transmission section.

With the 4L30e sitting on the bench none of the friction clutches are applied so rotating the turbine shaft or tail-shaft does nothing except rotate the associated planetary gear set carrier. Placing the selector in Park mechanically operates the Park pawl that locks the tail-shaft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ok. I had to read your response many times. Lots of info there.
From that I think I understand that without hydraulic pressure, none of the clutch packs engage and the tail shaft can spin freely, because it's only rotating the transmission planetary.
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I'm fuzzy on how the mode selector shaft fits into this? Is it acting mechanically for Park (pawl) and as a hydraulic control valve for the other modes?
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Here's why I'm confused. When the transmission was on the floor with transfer case attached, I could move the mode selector and thought I could feel when it was in gear/Park v. neutral. But with xfer case removed, I can only feel Park, and feely spins in all others.
 

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Ok. I had to read your response many times. Lots of info there.
From that I think I understand that without hydraulic pressure, none of the clutch packs engage and the tail shaft can spin freely, because it's only rotating the transmission planetary.
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I'm fuzzy on how the mode selector shaft fits into this? Is it acting mechanically for Park (pawl) and as a hydraulic control valve for the other modes?
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Here's why I'm confused. When the transmission was on the floor with transfer case attached, I could move the mode selector and thought I could feel when it was in gear/Park v. neutral. But with xfer case removed, I can only feel Park, and feely spins in all others.
The shaft that enters the transmission case on the LH side that is operated by the shift linkage operates transmission manual hydraulic valve and also a rod that mechanically operates the parking pawl located in the transmission extension housing. When the linkage is Park the pawl locks the tail-shaft.

When engine starts the torque converter shell spins the transmission ATF pump creating hydraulic pressure which causes the Overrun Clutch located in the overdrive section to apply. When the Overrun clutch is applied the overdrive section planetary operates at a 1:1 ratio allowing the torque converter turbine shaft to rotate the transmission section 3rd clutch drum.

If the selector moved to the Reverse position the Reverse clutch applies. When the Reverse clutch is applied it holds the 2nd Clutch drum stationary. The Ring Gear is mechanically attached to the 2nd Clutch drum, the Ring Gear mates with the transmission section planetary gear set long pinion gears. Since the Ring Gear is held stationary the long pinion gears are held stationary.

When engine rpm is increased to the point where the torque converter turbine starts to rotate the turbine shaft the 3rd clutch drum starts to rotate. The sprag unidirectional mechanical clutch is attached to the 3rd clutch drum. On engine acceleration the sprag locks and starts to drive the planetary gear set input sun gear, which in turn drives the planetary gear set short pinions. The long and short pinions are meshed together and since the long pinions and the Ring Gear are held stationary the planetary carrier and attached tail-shaft walk around the stationary Ring Gear in a counter clockwise direction to produce the Reverse gear ratio.

If the shifter is moved to the L position, the Reaction Drum brake band applies holding the reaction drum and attached sun gear stationary. The Overrun clutch and sprag work the same in L as Reverse. However, in L the 3rd clutch is applied so the 3rd clutch frictions actually drive the planetary gear set input sun gear. When the torque converter turbine starts to drive the 3rd clutch drum the planetary gear set input sun gear is driven by the 3rd clutch frictions as opposed to the sprag. The Reaction Drum sun gear mates with the long pinions so in L the planetary carrier and attached tail-shaft walk around the stationary Reaction Drum sun gear in a clockwise direction to produce the 1st gear ratio.

In the D, 2, and 3 positions the Range Mode Switch (RMS) sends gear range selection info to the PCM. The PCM uses this info to control the shift solenoids which apply and release the 2nd and 3rd clutches.

In Reverse the RMS causes the PCM to increase hydraulic pressure (Reverse Boost).
In Drive 1st gear the 3rd clutch is not applied so the sprag drives the planetary gear set input sun gear. This allows the vehicle to coast in Drive because the sprag can unlock. But in L the 3rd clutch is applied so there is engine compression braking.

Bottom line is no hydraulic pressure, no clutch apply so the planetary gear sets don't work. All the magic is created by planetary gear sets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Understood. No hyd press, no clutch apply.
I fitted the pieces of the converter housing together and used Alumiweld. It's holding them together but anybody's guess on how strong the joint is. The Alumiweld is strong but the aluminum housing is a huge heat sink and dissipated heat quickly. It took 8 - 10 min of steady oxy/acet heating. And if I had to stop for any reason, it quickly lost the heat. The parent material had to melt the rod or else it was just on the surface.
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It didn't turn out as perfect as I was hoping. That Alumiweld is tricky to use and almost impossible if trying to fill a joint on both sides of a relatively thin work piece. I got the outside done, then moved to the inside, because those gaping beveled joints were yelling my name. Once the parent material got to the desired temp (~730F) the outside Alumiweld started dripping off. Ugh.
Maybe I'll learn TIG...
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Currently, transmission is back in vehicle and TC attached to flywheel.
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I glossed over the seal/housing alignment on the converter housing install. The workshop manual and the Curmudgeon video (Tom) shows a special alignment tool. Tom remarked in his video that if it isn't aligned sufficiently, pump noise will result. He also mentioned the method which I used - let the TC be the tool. I kept all 12 bolts on the housing install about half a turn loose then set the TC in place. Gave the housing a gentle wiggle, and removed the TC. Torqued all bolts.
Tom stated that this method is a "50 - 50 chance." I guess we'll see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
3-week update:
Been running it daily, no excessive noise to report.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It’s gone no further than down the street and back to garage. Definitely not highway speed.
 
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