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Here's a gasket set for a 2.8 on eBay for less than $54 shipped:


Can't tell you what you'll need for the 3500 top end, but you can probably piecemeal that. You will need head gaskets for the 3.4. Looks like this kit doesn't come with head gaskets, anyway, which is no loss since the 2.8 gaskets wouldn't fit the larger-bore block.

The Fel-Pro kit should have everything you'd need for the short block, and then some. The rubber oil pan gasket, by itself, for example, ain't cheap.

BTW the Fel-Pro kit comes with black RTV to use on the intake, don't use it, though. Use Permatex Ultra-Grey, it's better for the application. I used their Ultra Gold (hi temp) on the oil pan and it's still oil-tight after 20 years. But you could use Ultra-Grey on that, too. GM RTV sealed my 3.4's intake, but Ultra-Grey is probably as good or better than the GM stuff, these days.

Don't use RTV on oil passages, though, the hardened bits can come loose. For example, on the rear main bearing cap; I used some anaerobic "gasket maker", Permatex red 51813, also known as Loctite "518". Loctite at one time owned Permatex for around 20 years, then sold it back. So their products are uniquely co-mingled.

Anaerobic sealer only hardens where it's squished. The main bearing cap is metal-to-metal, so 518 is appropriate there. Any product that happens to sqeezes out, will just be flushed harmlessly thru the oiling system. There's a O-ringed passage thru the bearing cap, a little 518 on the O-Ring won't hurt. This stuff is used sparingly, just a wee dab then spread it out with a gloved finger. As I recall, the gasket kit should have that O-ring in it.
 

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Ahh the throw out bearing. Thanks So I need the bronze bushing that presses into the crank, that throw out bearing, and maybe an input shaft bearing. Get it while your in there...... Anyway, tomorrow is another day.
Is the transmission noisy in Neutral? If not, then there should be no need to replace the input shaft bearing. IDK if you can get enough access by pulling the cover, to be able to pull it off the input shaft.

You may have to take the trans apart for that. I'll leave that advice to the MUA5 experts! But, transmission-wise, if it ain't broke, don't fix it!

BTW on the throwout bearing, use care with that bearing retaining sleeve, they're hard to find and can be broken.
The bearing is best removed and reinstalled with a press.
 

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1990 trooper 2, 76 Datsun 620
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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
The last time I drove it regularly I do remember something had a rattle when the clutch was let out sitting in neutral, push the clutch in and it would go away. Jerry was saying that could be normal.
So without a press I could be screwed on the throw out bearing?
 

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Most any auto parts store with a machine shop can do an R&R on the throwout bearing, for a nominal fee. On the transmission input shaft, you can see how much (if any) free play it has when you wiggle it. You can also turn it and see if you can feel any roughness. Then evaluate from there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
i think I will leave the input shaft stuff alone, unless i can get the seal in n out?
Im dead set on somehow replacing that throwout bearing....do those go bad often? whats the likleyhood of that being the factory installed bearing. Its had maybe 1 clutch? 2 clutches put in???
 

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I feel like a throw out bearing going bad is one of the most common issues with a clutch. It's not terrible to get out if I remember correctly. I think I tried grease and something dumb like wet paper towel and couldn't get it, so I just used a seal puller or screw driver or something and snagged it out of there.
 

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We're talking about the clutch throwout bearing that is pressed into the bearing carrier, that slides along the input shaft as the clutch fork pushes on it to disengage the clutch. It should always be renewed when replacing a clutch, and you're right, the Oilite bronze pilot bushing in the crankshaft should be replaced too.

You might be able to get the throwout bearing off the carrier with a gear puller, and if you have a big vise, you might be able to press the new bearing on to the carrier. Remember to always press the new bearing onto a shaft or sleeve by its center race, so as not to damage the ball bearings or the race (as you might if you put a lot of pressure on the outer portion of the bearing).

Of course on other applications where the o.d. of the bearing is pressed into a housing, etc, you press by the o.d. only.

Far as that goes, you can probably drive the throwout bearing out of the bearing carrier by laying the assembly in the top of a big vise, such that the bearing straddles to top, then, using a long socket or sturdy pipe or other driving tool that's slightly smaller than the i.d. of the throwout bearing, drive the bearing carrier down and out.

You wouldn't want to beat the new bearing back on, however. You could possibly freeze the bearing carrier, and heat the new bearing to around 200F in a toaster oven. Then slap that baby on while it's hot. The difference in contraction/expansion of the parts should be enough to slide it easily onto the carrier. You have to get it straight, and only one chance to do it right!

Or just have the machine shop press it on.

You could use this as an excuse to go buy a Harbor Freight press. Best purchase you'll ever make, you can do so much with a press. A 12-ton is nice, it'll get your job done, a 20-ton is even nicer! Years ago I picked up a good used 20-ton press with dual-speed hydraulics. It works great, I've done wheel bearings, pressing-on/in bearings of all sorts, removing/reinstalling A-arm/control arm bushings, etc etc etc. A Handy Device!
 

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1990 trooper 2, 76 Datsun 620
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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
We're talking about the clutch throwout bearing that is pressed into the bearing carrier, that slides along the input shaft as the clutch fork pushes on it to disengage the clutch. It should always be renewed when replacing a clutch, and you're right, the Oilite bronze pilot bushing in the crankshaft should be replaced too.

You might be able to get the throwout bearing off the carrier with a gear puller, and if you have a big vise, you might be able to press the new bearing on to the carrier. Remember to always press the new bearing onto a shaft or sleeve by its center race, so as not to damage the ball bearings or the race (as you might if you put a lot of pressure on the outer portion of the bearing).

Of course on other applications where the o.d. of the bearing is pressed into a housing, etc, you press by the o.d. only.

Far as that goes, you can probably drive the throwout bearing out of the bearing carrier by laying the assembly in the top of a big vise, such that the bearing straddles to top, then, using a long socket or sturdy pipe or other driving tool that's slightly smaller than the i.d. of the throwout bearing, drive the bearing carrier down and out.

You wouldn't want to beat the new bearing back on, however. You could possibly freeze the bearing carrier, and heat the new bearing to around 200F in a toaster oven. Then slap that baby on while it's hot. The difference in contraction/expansion of the parts should be enough to slide it easily onto the carrier. You have to get it straight, and only one chance to do it right!

Or just have the machine shop press it on.

You could use this as an excuse to go buy a Harbor Freight press. Best purchase you'll ever make, you can do so much with a press. A 12-ton is nice, it'll get your job done, a 20-ton is even nicer! Years ago I picked up a good used 20-ton press with dual-speed hydraulics. It works great, I've done wheel bearings, pressing-on/in bearings of all sorts, removing/reinstalling A-arm/control arm bushings, etc etc etc. A Handy Device!
Thanks Ed, I might actually need a press since my control arm bushings are shot. There’s not much room in my garage but I’ll make it work.
 

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I got a driver disc set like this and it made pressing out/in the lower control arm bushings on a Honda Element a cinch:


I had to buy some heavy-duty press plates for my dual-speed 20-ton press, they weren't cheap (around $120 on eBay). The Harbor Freight 12-ton (the cheapest one) comes with a set of plates, probably not as heavy-duty but should be serviceable.


You might catch a good sale for New Years. Subscribe to their emails and you'll get tons of offers.

Drove my daughter to work in the snow today, the Trooper ran great! I followed my own advice and blocked-off half the grille with cardboard, and the temp gauge needle actually came off of "C". Plenty of compact snow & ice on the roads, but the Trusty Ol' Trooper handled them with aplomb!
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
I got a driver disc set like this and it made pressing out/in the lower control arm bushings on a Honda Element a cinch:


I had to buy some heavy-duty press plates for my dual-speed 20-ton press, they weren't cheap (around $120 on eBay). The Harbor Freight 12-ton (the cheapest one) comes with a set of plates, probably not as heavy-duty but should be serviceable.


You might catch a good sale for New Years. Subscribe to their emails and you'll get tons of offers.

Drove my daughter to work in the snow today, the Trooper ran great! I followed my own advice and blocked-off half the grille with cardboard, and the temp gauge needle actually came off of "C". Plenty of compact snow & ice on the roads, but the Trusty Ol' Trooper handled them with aplomb!
That’s good to hear, right now I’m driving my Datsun pickup around, usually I do the cardboard trick, I actually have a grill cover I made up out of some copper sheet that I had left over from a kitchen project.
I can tell that this trick actually works.
I think I’ll be having some down time for a good couple of weeks, working part time so I can’t order a bunch of parts that I need. Besides that 3.4 will be ready anytime now, so I gotta keep what I have for that. Anyway there’s plenty of teardown, cleanup, painting, porting/polishing the manifolds, figuring out the throttle body stuff, tearing out tie rods, figuring this n that. Plenty to do still.
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
So I’m a little confused here as to what clutch I actually got in the mail. Ed, you had the Sachs, does all this look familiar?
Why does the pressure plate say Valeo and made in Korea, while the housing or assembly whatever it is has a made in Japan stamp with no other brand markings.
I thought it was an unopened box item that was new old stock. Maybe the seller didn’t say I’ll have to go back and look at the eBay listing.
 

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Yeah, there's plenty of work to do in the prep phase. But it's a lot more fun than the Ripout! It'll keep you busy for a while, plus you've got your 3500 conversion on top of that.

Funny, my first pu Way Back When was a '72 PL521 with the L16. Put a Weber single sidedraft carb on it and it would outrun a 2.8 Olds Omega "Sports Coupe". Fun to drive but spung like a tank. Think 1800 lbs of concrete culverts and headlights pointing skywards!

Later I picked up a '77 King Cab with the L20B, which I reworked with 280Z valve seats & valves, and a bigger carb. Great rig but the front drums were terrible. If only I'd known back then about disc brake conversions/spindle swap!

Then had a '90 King Cab V6, sold that in the late '90's and years later bought a 98 Frontier KC. So just a few Datsuns/Nissans. That's not to mention my '72 1200 Coupe, '71 510 Wagon, '77 810 Wagon (rare and very rusty).

15+ years for the Frontier, and it's almost ready to hit 90,000 miles. Had about 61,000 on it back in '06. Don't think I'll be wearing it out anytime soon. Gets 28mpg on the hiway, not too shabby for 24-yr-old technology.
 

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So I’m a little confused here as to what clutch I actually got in the mail. Ed, you had the Sachs, does all this look familiar?
Why does the pressure plate say Valeo and made in Korea, while the housing or assembly whatever it is has a made in Japan stamp with no other brand markings.
I thought it was an unopened box item that was new old stock. Maybe the seller didn’t say I’ll have to go back and look at the eBay listing.
Well, it looks like there's a bit of i-n-c-e-s-t in the clutch world! I checked the stock photos on eBay in different auctions, and they do show a Valeo stamp and a 4-spring clutch disc. So maybe it's a combination of several vendor's parts that make up the "Sachs" branded kit. It looks like the disc has fine splines, and is the correct configuration for a GM V6.

You could check to make sure everything lines up before you bolt it up. The input shaft has 24 splines and the pressure plate should align with the bolts/dowels on the flywheel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
I don’t mean to complain but I will NEED a damn good clutch, and if I didn’t get what I ordered I could have just got the valeo kit or even a LUK. Fleabay is great but you potentially get these kinds of “deals”. That’s if I got a bogus deal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
well ive been away for a bit and not much progress has happened. I picked up my 3.4 block today, with some head gaskets that arent the right ones so thats a let down. The shop also used factory replacement cam bearings when i went out of my way to bring the SBC bearings to them...... its a little bit of a durability feature using bearings from the small block because they are a wider bearing so its spreads the load better. so they kept the bearings and charged me for the ones they installed. Whatever, I'll remove and install new ones. Its really hard to get a shop to do the work you want when its a very peculiar application so I will just eat that cost and not complain too much. They will get me the proper gaskets though which is cool. What I need is the cometic 5266-060, stock 00' 3.4 impala gaskets that match the pistons i have. Those pistons come proud of the block .020" so its important to have the .060" gasket to get optimal quench. Im not sure using the .051" gasket they got me will be thick enough, you dont want a piston slamming into a valve.
Anyway lots left to do! Need to drain the diff and refill, drain the trans and transfer case and refill, `I would like to do the trans and transfer case breather mod that Geoff up in B.C. has done but I really dont want to remove that assembly! I need to drop the fuel tank and install a different pump, or do the access panel ive seen, need to order some more parts, zip off some engine bosses, paint some stuff, resurface the flyweheel, the clutch I bought fits up, hmmm, yep lots to do.
I'll be putting the block on the engine stand here soon. To be continued...
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
I was looking at my cam bearings the shop installed......they are all gouged up!!!! and theres metal chunks n slivers throughout that channel. Im dissapointed, Im 100% driving out those bearings and putting in new ones. The guys did a "test fit" of the old cam and said it was a little stiff and i thought nothing of it at first. I was charged for lifters as well.... so where are they? And I see i paid for a flywheel R&R when i didnt bring in a flywheel, so ive quite a bone to pick now.
After all of that though, Im on hold now due to my lack of parts, fluids, and wanting to clean the crap out of everything.
 
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