Isuzu SUV Forum banner
21 - 40 of 68 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,959 Posts
I believe the stock 3400 makes like 180 I can’t remember. I’m sure the stock 3500 make 200 minimum. I think the 3.4 made 160? I have heard the 3.4 with 3400 heads can do about 190 or so on a mild build, on some 3.4’s with 3500 were expecting 250-300, depending on how wild the build. It’s one hell of a v6. Gm is doing amazing things with the 60 degree these days. There’s a version of the equinox that has a 3.6L, and it makes 285hp NA, but it’s VVT. The rest of the VVT is impressive as well, such as the 3500 VVT, and the 3.9L (impala?)....
Thanks, I was just curious because I see it mentioned a lot but never knew. Seems like a pretty good swap for the first gen Troopers.
 

·
Registered
1990 trooper 2, 76 Datsun 620
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Am I supposed to remove the tie rods just to access the bolts that hold the axle into the frame? Maybe I’m looking at the wrong ones...... I’ll try to snag a picture
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,701 Posts
I don't recall having anything in the way of the diff frame mounting bolts. And they are bolts, not nuts. So maybe the one in the pic is the wrong one. The ones I undid are right inline with the frame and go straight up into the frame. They go into a rubber bushing that has a metal sleeve bonded into it.

On my 3.4, the bolts came right out. On the "2.8 Stroker" Trooper, the bolts were stuck pretty bad. I ended up turning my air pressure WAY up and getting a new Craftsman air impact, then rattling on the bolts (after heating) maybe 20 minutes to bust 'em loose.

The O.D. of the bolt was rusted into the I.D. of the inner steel sleeve, and of course if you just turned that with a big breaker bar & socket, the bolt loosened then sprung back. Impossible to get out except by breaking that rust bond. As I recall there's one big bolt Aft and one big bolt Fwd of the axle. But it's only been about 15 years since I pulled one out, so forgive my old memory if that's not the case!

On the bell housing, not enough room to get the box end of a combination wrench on those cranky bolt heads? Then you just use a "persuader" to bust 'em loose.

Failing that, did you pull the metal mount brackets off the block yet? You'll get a lot more clearance doing so. Then lay the engine down and as the engine leans forward a bit, the bell housing is better exposed. Still tight, but you can even run a bunch of 1/2" extensions underneath the rig, fwd to the bell housing bolts. Use an air impact to break free the bolts. If you have an air ratchet, that's a lot of help when underneath the rig wrenching. Once the bolts are busted loose, the ratchet will take 'em right out. And a lot lighter to hold onto then the impact.

Don't give up, you're getting close! You really do want to drop the front diff assy, though, especially if you have a 5-speed. Otherwise it's real tight on the input-shaft-to-clutch going out.

G'luck............ed
 

·
Registered
1990 trooper 2, 76 Datsun 620
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Alright I got the 4 of (6?) bell housing bolts from the top without dropping the front axle.
I turned the passenger side idler arm just enough to fit a socket and extension on the axle to frame mounting bolts and broke it loose.
Tomorrow is another day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,701 Posts
That's the way! Go get some well-deserved rest!! 👍
 

·
Registered
1990 trooper 2, 76 Datsun 620
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
I’m also trying to replace all my tie rods, about an hr of hammering I moved on....
I don’t have a regular 17mm box end wrench, just the ratcheting type and it didn’t want to fit, and my breaker bar does not slide over that geared end. I ended up using a craftsman “max access” ratchet and socket to clear the firewall a bit and give a good purchase on that bolt. Then slid the breaker bar over that. Uuummfff!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,701 Posts
Gotta have some open/box end wrenches, man! Hard to do much without.

Check on Slickdeals.net for the best deals on all kinds of stuff. I have a search saved for "wrench" so lots of sales pop up in my mailbox. This is a great time of year for that, too.

The reason why you want a basic set of combination (open and box ends) wrenches is that they may get into a tighter spot than a Gearwrench, and you can use a "persuader" (i.e. hammer) on them to loosen cranky bolts.

You don't want to beat on the ratcheting Gearwrench, but they do have a great purpose in being able to ratchet in tight spots.

This Kobalt set on sale at Lowes is less than $11.00 and should give you adequate service for what you're doing.


Maybe Santa will drop some wrenches in your Christmas Stocking! Of course, a lump of Coal is gaining in value daily!! Harrr! 😼

Regarding breaking-loose tie rod ends, I worked on a Honda Element early Fall and this tool easily busted loose ball joints and the tie rod ends:


Gearwrench ball joint separator, I was worried that it might not be strong enough for the Element ball joints (they were NASTY), but it popped them like nobody's business. A very well-made tool. It made short work of the tie rod ends as well. Its design is such that it won't damage the grease boots when you're breaking a joint. Which is a nice feature if you've got to bust a joint that was recently replaced, and you don't want to damage anything.

Cheers...........ed
 

·
Registered
1990 trooper 2, 76 Datsun 620
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 · (Edited)
Gotta have some open/box end wrenches, man! Hard to do much without.

Check on Slickdeals.net for the best deals on all kinds of stuff. I have a search saved for "wrench" so lots of sales pop up in my mailbox. This is a great time of year for that, too.

The reason why you want a basic set of combination (open and box ends) wrenches is that they may get into a tighter spot than a Gearwrench, and you can use a "persuader" (i.e. hammer) on them to loosen cranky bolts.

You don't want to beat on the ratcheting Gearwrench, but they do have a great purpose in being able to ratchet in tight spots.

This Kobalt set on sale at Lowes is less than $11.00 and should give you adequate service for what you're doing.


Maybe Santa will drop some wrenches in your Christmas Stocking! Of course, a lump of Coal is gaining in value daily!! Harrr! 😼

Regarding breaking-loose tie rod ends, I worked on a Honda Element early Fall and this tool easily busted loose ball joints and the tie rod ends:


Gearwrench ball joint separator, I was worried that it might not be strong enough for the Element ball joints (they were NASTY), but it popped them like nobody's business. A very well-made tool. It made short work of the tie rod ends as well. Its design is such that it won't damage the grease boots when you're breaking a joint. Which is a nice feature if you've got to bust a joint that was recently replaced, and you don't want to damage anything.

Cheers...........ed
Thanks Ed.
As far as the wrenches I actually have everything BUT the 16&17mm wrenches, my kit didn’t come with them, or I probably bought individually as needed I don’t remember. I wrote that down on the whiteboard as a “need this”. I’ll do the same with that ball joint separator, my pitman arm tool wasn’t cutting it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,701 Posts
Excellent deal on the clutch. The one I used in the "Stroker" Trooper had very nice action.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,701 Posts
It's a Christmas Miracle! Now the real fun begins!! ❄
 

·
Registered
1990 trooper 2, 76 Datsun 620
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #38 ·
That was a fight but I guess going back in is the real fight. I had to cut some exhaust on the passenger side, the flange right there at the front driveshaft had rusty bolts and I rounded one of them. Otherwise all other flanges came apart easily. I figured out how to drop the front axle, it sure did help. Now I suppose I should order a bunch of parts and use the down time to remove what I need from the 2.8 block.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,701 Posts
That's the throwout bearing. Take a look at the clutch fork, and you'll see how it's held to the bearing retainer with a spring clip. The whole assembly should move back-and-forth on the transmission input shaft when you move the clutch fork.

The clutch fork has a spring clip on its backside, that pops into a ball stud that mounts on the transmission. You should be able to take a big screwdriver or other prying tool and pry the fork off the ball. Then you can start moving the assy around to take it off the shaft. If the bearing retainer doesn't want to move, try spraying it with some lube. You may have to heat it up a bit if it's stubborn.

The transmission input shaft is under the front cover that bolts to the bell housing.

The pilot shaft is in the crankshaft, and you'll have to be sure the 3.4 has a new one pressed in before you reassemble.
 

·
Registered
1990 trooper 2, 76 Datsun 620
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Ahh the throw out bearing. Thanks
So I need the bronze bushing that presses into the crank, that throw out bearing, and maybe an input shaft bearing. Get it while your in there......
Anyway, tomorrow is another day.
 
21 - 40 of 68 Posts
Top