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Yeah, pull the front driveshaft, it makes for much better access. For more clearance at the top, unbolt the metal motor mount brackets from the lower frame mounts; then lift the engine up on a hoist, and remove the metal brackets from the block. Then you'll be able to drop the engine down farther and gain access to the top bolts at the back. For some of the bell housing bolts I still had to stack some long extensions together and have at it from underneath. You can put an impact on it if necessary. Once I had those busted loose, was able to use an air ratchet and that made things a lot less strenuous. Gear Wrenches help get in the tight spots, if you have a set.

You can also drop the front differential assembly with its mounting bracket to the frame. This gives a lot more clearance for the oil pan, coming out. There are (2) quite large bolts per side, sticking straight up into the frame.

You may have to cut out your exhaust if you can't get it undone. You're probably gonna have to redo it all anyway, with that hot-rod engine you're building!

Should run really nice with the 3500 heads. MPFI should give you a very responsive engine and I'd think that it should give better mpg than a TBI'd 3.4.

And yeah, it's a lot of work, but there will be no car payments on a new $60,000 SUV. And you'll have something quite unique!

Fall/Winter did come at us fast, I ended up working on my Trooper far too far into the Season. But I did get my oil change done and a new headlight installed. So I no longer have an aquarium in my grille!

BTW no one should complain about posting helpful links. I've been doing that for years with no gripes from anyone. Any good info is welcome, we're not too stuck-up here!! 馃樇

Keep up the good documentation, this will be an excellent build thread!...............ed

p.s. starter is on the Driver's side all the way aft and there are 2 mounting bolts sticking straight up. Solenoid connections are at the forward end of the starter. You can disconnect the entire wiring harness off the engine, and peel it back to the pssgr's side.
 

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What diameter is your cat and everything to the rear of that? I have a dual-inlet cat that takes the 2" downpipes from both exhaust manifolds, and goes into one single 2-1/2" outlet, with the rest of the system 2-1/2" diameter. That should be big enough for the hybrid, any larger and it may kill your low-end.
 

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Now looking at the cat you have Ed, I think I may have to get something like that... you posted a link in another thread. Here in Idaho they don鈥檛 really check for the catalytic converters..... but I鈥檓 planet friendly wink
Yeah, you could make the single-inlet cat work by using an aftermarket "wye". Or you can go to the dual-inlet cat which also has the added benefit of having an O2 sensor bung at each end. The O2 sensor will run a lot hotter sitting in the cat, which is a Good Thing. Lights-off the sensor faster, and keeping it hotter gives a more accurate signal to the ECM.

The Walker 15022 cat went way up in price, but this generic cat is only $52 shipped on eBay and comes with a 5-yr 50,000 warranty:

Universal Catalytic Converter Oval 2.5" Inlet 2" Outlet EPA Approved Weld-On | eBay

And here's a Magnaflow wye pipe that might work ok with your existing cat:


The cat's cheaper than the wye, and less trouble since you won't have to weld-in a sensor bung, which you'd have to do for the wye.
 

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That should be a strong runner!

GM rated the Goodwrench crate motor at 160hp and around 195 torque IIRC. That was using a "wheezy" old S-10 intake with 2-bbl carb. Not exactly the best for performance. The cam they used in was the equivalent of a Comp Cams "252" torque cam and it did have better low-end torque than a Camaro or Firebird 3.4 with whatever grind they used in the F-bodies. I think that engine ran out of steam somewhere around 4500 rpm.

There was an S10 dude on the old S-Series.org site who had a 3.4 in his S10. As I recall it had the Holley Big-Bore TBI and a bored intake, 1.6:1 Comp Cams Magnum roller-tipped rocker arms, headers, and free-flowing exhaust. I can't recall if he cammed it, maybe Geoff does. At any rate, he dyno'd it and got 187 rwhp. If you figure 10% losses, that's almost 208hp at the crankshaft. Pretty healthy! Mine has similar mods but no headers. It runs quite well, regardless, and will still spin willingly past 5000 if I push it.

So it'll be interesting to see how your build turns out. Keep On Wrenching!..........ed
 

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I don't recall having anything in the way of the diff frame mounting bolts. And they are bolts, not nuts. So maybe the one in the pic is the wrong one. The ones I undid are right inline with the frame and go straight up into the frame. They go into a rubber bushing that has a metal sleeve bonded into it.

On my 3.4, the bolts came right out. On the "2.8 Stroker" Trooper, the bolts were stuck pretty bad. I ended up turning my air pressure WAY up and getting a new Craftsman air impact, then rattling on the bolts (after heating) maybe 20 minutes to bust 'em loose.

The O.D. of the bolt was rusted into the I.D. of the inner steel sleeve, and of course if you just turned that with a big breaker bar & socket, the bolt loosened then sprung back. Impossible to get out except by breaking that rust bond. As I recall there's one big bolt Aft and one big bolt Fwd of the axle. But it's only been about 15 years since I pulled one out, so forgive my old memory if that's not the case!

On the bell housing, not enough room to get the box end of a combination wrench on those cranky bolt heads? Then you just use a "persuader" to bust 'em loose.

Failing that, did you pull the metal mount brackets off the block yet? You'll get a lot more clearance doing so. Then lay the engine down and as the engine leans forward a bit, the bell housing is better exposed. Still tight, but you can even run a bunch of 1/2" extensions underneath the rig, fwd to the bell housing bolts. Use an air impact to break free the bolts. If you have an air ratchet, that's a lot of help when underneath the rig wrenching. Once the bolts are busted loose, the ratchet will take 'em right out. And a lot lighter to hold onto then the impact.

Don't give up, you're getting close! You really do want to drop the front diff assy, though, especially if you have a 5-speed. Otherwise it's real tight on the input-shaft-to-clutch going out.

G'luck............ed
 

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That's the way! Go get some well-deserved rest!! 馃憤
 

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Gotta have some open/box end wrenches, man! Hard to do much without.

Check on Slickdeals.net for the best deals on all kinds of stuff. I have a search saved for "wrench" so lots of sales pop up in my mailbox. This is a great time of year for that, too.

The reason why you want a basic set of combination (open and box ends) wrenches is that they may get into a tighter spot than a Gearwrench, and you can use a "persuader" (i.e. hammer) on them to loosen cranky bolts.

You don't want to beat on the ratcheting Gearwrench, but they do have a great purpose in being able to ratchet in tight spots.

This Kobalt set on sale at Lowes is less than $11.00 and should give you adequate service for what you're doing.


Maybe Santa will drop some wrenches in your Christmas Stocking! Of course, a lump of Coal is gaining in value daily!! Harrr! 馃樇

Regarding breaking-loose tie rod ends, I worked on a Honda Element early Fall and this tool easily busted loose ball joints and the tie rod ends:


Gearwrench ball joint separator, I was worried that it might not be strong enough for the Element ball joints (they were NASTY), but it popped them like nobody's business. A very well-made tool. It made short work of the tie rod ends as well. Its design is such that it won't damage the grease boots when you're breaking a joint. Which is a nice feature if you've got to bust a joint that was recently replaced, and you don't want to damage anything.

Cheers...........ed
 

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Excellent deal on the clutch. The one I used in the "Stroker" Trooper had very nice action.
 

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It's a Christmas Miracle! Now the real fun begins!! 鉂
 

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That's the throwout bearing. Take a look at the clutch fork, and you'll see how it's held to the bearing retainer with a spring clip. The whole assembly should move back-and-forth on the transmission input shaft when you move the clutch fork.

The clutch fork has a spring clip on its backside, that pops into a ball stud that mounts on the transmission. You should be able to take a big screwdriver or other prying tool and pry the fork off the ball. Then you can start moving the assy around to take it off the shaft. If the bearing retainer doesn't want to move, try spraying it with some lube. You may have to heat it up a bit if it's stubborn.

The transmission input shaft is under the front cover that bolts to the bell housing.

The pilot shaft is in the crankshaft, and you'll have to be sure the 3.4 has a new one pressed in before you reassemble.
 

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Here's a gasket set for a 2.8 on eBay for less than $54 shipped:


Can't tell you what you'll need for the 3500 top end, but you can probably piecemeal that. You will need head gaskets for the 3.4. Looks like this kit doesn't come with head gaskets, anyway, which is no loss since the 2.8 gaskets wouldn't fit the larger-bore block.

The Fel-Pro kit should have everything you'd need for the short block, and then some. The rubber oil pan gasket, by itself, for example, ain't cheap.

BTW the Fel-Pro kit comes with black RTV to use on the intake, don't use it, though. Use Permatex Ultra-Grey, it's better for the application. I used their Ultra Gold (hi temp) on the oil pan and it's still oil-tight after 20 years. But you could use Ultra-Grey on that, too. GM RTV sealed my 3.4's intake, but Ultra-Grey is probably as good or better than the GM stuff, these days.

Don't use RTV on oil passages, though, the hardened bits can come loose. For example, on the rear main bearing cap; I used some anaerobic "gasket maker", Permatex red 51813, also known as Loctite "518". Loctite at one time owned Permatex for around 20 years, then sold it back. So their products are uniquely co-mingled.

Anaerobic sealer only hardens where it's squished. The main bearing cap is metal-to-metal, so 518 is appropriate there. Any product that happens to sqeezes out, will just be flushed harmlessly thru the oiling system. There's a O-ringed passage thru the bearing cap, a little 518 on the O-Ring won't hurt. This stuff is used sparingly, just a wee dab then spread it out with a gloved finger. As I recall, the gasket kit should have that O-ring in it.
 

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Ahh the throw out bearing. Thanks So I need the bronze bushing that presses into the crank, that throw out bearing, and maybe an input shaft bearing. Get it while your in there...... Anyway, tomorrow is another day.
Is the transmission noisy in Neutral? If not, then there should be no need to replace the input shaft bearing. IDK if you can get enough access by pulling the cover, to be able to pull it off the input shaft.

You may have to take the trans apart for that. I'll leave that advice to the MUA5 experts! But, transmission-wise, if it ain't broke, don't fix it!

BTW on the throwout bearing, use care with that bearing retaining sleeve, they're hard to find and can be broken.
The bearing is best removed and reinstalled with a press.
 

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Most any auto parts store with a machine shop can do an R&R on the throwout bearing, for a nominal fee. On the transmission input shaft, you can see how much (if any) free play it has when you wiggle it. You can also turn it and see if you can feel any roughness. Then evaluate from there.
 

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We're talking about the clutch throwout bearing that is pressed into the bearing carrier, that slides along the input shaft as the clutch fork pushes on it to disengage the clutch. It should always be renewed when replacing a clutch, and you're right, the Oilite bronze pilot bushing in the crankshaft should be replaced too.

You might be able to get the throwout bearing off the carrier with a gear puller, and if you have a big vise, you might be able to press the new bearing on to the carrier. Remember to always press the new bearing onto a shaft or sleeve by its center race, so as not to damage the ball bearings or the race (as you might if you put a lot of pressure on the outer portion of the bearing).

Of course on other applications where the o.d. of the bearing is pressed into a housing, etc, you press by the o.d. only.

Far as that goes, you can probably drive the throwout bearing out of the bearing carrier by laying the assembly in the top of a big vise, such that the bearing straddles to top, then, using a long socket or sturdy pipe or other driving tool that's slightly smaller than the i.d. of the throwout bearing, drive the bearing carrier down and out.

You wouldn't want to beat the new bearing back on, however. You could possibly freeze the bearing carrier, and heat the new bearing to around 200F in a toaster oven. Then slap that baby on while it's hot. The difference in contraction/expansion of the parts should be enough to slide it easily onto the carrier. You have to get it straight, and only one chance to do it right!

Or just have the machine shop press it on.

You could use this as an excuse to go buy a Harbor Freight press. Best purchase you'll ever make, you can do so much with a press. A 12-ton is nice, it'll get your job done, a 20-ton is even nicer! Years ago I picked up a good used 20-ton press with dual-speed hydraulics. It works great, I've done wheel bearings, pressing-on/in bearings of all sorts, removing/reinstalling A-arm/control arm bushings, etc etc etc. A Handy Device!
 

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I got a driver disc set like this and it made pressing out/in the lower control arm bushings on a Honda Element a cinch:


I had to buy some heavy-duty press plates for my dual-speed 20-ton press, they weren't cheap (around $120 on eBay). The Harbor Freight 12-ton (the cheapest one) comes with a set of plates, probably not as heavy-duty but should be serviceable.


You might catch a good sale for New Years. Subscribe to their emails and you'll get tons of offers.

Drove my daughter to work in the snow today, the Trooper ran great! I followed my own advice and blocked-off half the grille with cardboard, and the temp gauge needle actually came off of "C". Plenty of compact snow & ice on the roads, but the Trusty Ol' Trooper handled them with aplomb!
 

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Yeah, there's plenty of work to do in the prep phase. But it's a lot more fun than the Ripout! It'll keep you busy for a while, plus you've got your 3500 conversion on top of that.

Funny, my first pu Way Back When was a '72 PL521 with the L16. Put a Weber single sidedraft carb on it and it would outrun a 2.8 Olds Omega "Sports Coupe". Fun to drive but spung like a tank. Think 1800 lbs of concrete culverts and headlights pointing skywards!

Later I picked up a '77 King Cab with the L20B, which I reworked with 280Z valve seats & valves, and a bigger carb. Great rig but the front drums were terrible. If only I'd known back then about disc brake conversions/spindle swap!

Then had a '90 King Cab V6, sold that in the late '90's and years later bought a 98 Frontier KC. So just a few Datsuns/Nissans. That's not to mention my '72 1200 Coupe, '71 510 Wagon, '77 810 Wagon (rare and very rusty).

15+ years for the Frontier, and it's almost ready to hit 90,000 miles. Had about 61,000 on it back in '06. Don't think I'll be wearing it out anytime soon. Gets 28mpg on the hiway, not too shabby for 24-yr-old technology.
 

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So I鈥檓 a little confused here as to what clutch I actually got in the mail. Ed, you had the Sachs, does all this look familiar?
Why does the pressure plate say Valeo and made in Korea, while the housing or assembly whatever it is has a made in Japan stamp with no other brand markings.
I thought it was an unopened box item that was new old stock. Maybe the seller didn鈥檛 say I鈥檒l have to go back and look at the eBay listing.
Well, it looks like there's a bit of i-n-c-e-s-t in the clutch world! I checked the stock photos on eBay in different auctions, and they do show a Valeo stamp and a 4-spring clutch disc. So maybe it's a combination of several vendor's parts that make up the "Sachs" branded kit. It looks like the disc has fine splines, and is the correct configuration for a GM V6.

You could check to make sure everything lines up before you bolt it up. The input shaft has 24 splines and the pressure plate should align with the bolts/dowels on the flywheel.
 

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I'd be a whole lot more than disappointed! I'd be having some very stern words with the manager of the machine shop. Any shop that can't handle installing a set of Chevy cam bearings shouldn't be working on engines at all!

And BTW, it's been established for Eons that small block Chev V8 cam bearings can be used in the 60-degree V6.

I'll quote you some good info from the GM 60-degree V6 "bible",

How to Rebuild Your GM V-6 60 Degree Engine by Tom Currao:

Aside from excessive wear, the cam bearings will need to be replaced if you have the block hot-tanked, since hot-tanking destroys them. Replacing the bearings requires special tools and expertise, so save yourself time and money and have your machine shop do it. The shop will use a long rod with a plate screwed onto one end to drive out the old bearings and install new ones. As the new bearings are installed, attention is paid to the alignment of the bearing lube holes with the groove that runs around the perimeter of each cam bearings bore in the block.

<my boldface>

In some instances, this alignment is so far off that the shop has to install the wider cam bearings from a 350ci small-block Chevy, because these bearings are wider than the stock bearings and allow the shop to compensate for misalignment. However, because of the additional width, these bearings have to be precisely positioned to avoid contact with the cam lobes. Unless you're confident you can do this work yourself, it's better left to the pros.

Also, keep in mind that a new type of cam bearings is being used in later-model engines. Instead of the traditional babbit lining, the bearings have a very hard wear surface, similar to that of oilite. These bearings should offer longer service life along with decreased oil pressure loss due to wear. So if you're in the market for cam bearings, you should consider using this later-style design.


Granted this is from 1994, the use of aluminum-clad bearings is quite common nowadays and you should be using that type of bearing for cam, mains, and rods.

IDK if you sent the crankshaft off to the machine shop, but typically they'd use a micrometer set to measure the crank for worn journals, and also put the crank on a set of V-Blocks and do a runout with a dial indicator. If the crankshaft is still Standard, and the journals are nice n' smooth or clean up with a light polish to specifications, then all you need is a set of Standard bearings.

If the crank journals are in poor condition, then they'd be telling you how much undersize all the journals will have to be ground. Or you can just throw the old crankshaft at them as a core, and for a nominal fee they'll give you back a nice reground crank/bearing kit with all the appropriate-sized bearings included.

IDK about you, but I wouldn't have so much faith in the machine shop. I picked and chose all of my parts so I could control the quality.

When you assemble the crank into the block, you still need to use some Plasti-Gage Green to check oil clearances on the mains and rods. I'm assuming you don't have access to a micrometer set.

Another thing comes to mind, what are you doing with your rods? I had mine reconditioned and the machine shop pressed them onto new Sealed Power coated pistons. Not cheap but you know the rods are straight, and the big & little ends are the correct i.d.

I looked up a '94 Camaro 3400 and the main/rod bearings you'd want are the "A-Series". Rockauto is offering those in a Sealed Power and Mahle flavor. Both are quality brands. Enginetech also shows an aluminum-silicone bearing; they talk about that in the detailed description. These bearings will wear much better than babbit and they're far more resistant to corrosion from inadvertent coolant in the oil.

Here are some Sealed Power Bi-Metal aluminum cam bearings for a Chevy V8, I'm assuming something like those would be what you'd want:


Rockauto (among many others, I'd assume) carries them, too.

HTH & G'luck at the machine shop.............ed
 

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Yeah, it might be good to leave the cam bearing installation to the professional engine builder. I've never done it, I let the shop do the install. Apparently my shop is capable of doing that!

And "really stiff" is NEVER what you want to hear about your cam's fit with new bearings in the block!!!

What you'd rather hear is "Smooth as Butta"! I'm thinking that your shop didn't get the bearings lined up properly with the cam lobes, causing big issues.

I found some good info on cam bearing installation, it's not as simple as it would seem:


Here's a helpful D-I-Y writeup with good descriptions and lots of pictures. Plus a recommendation for cam tool:


Some good words about cam bearing "clocking":


Some Very Old School tricks and tips in this discussion:


Be aware that the bearings ain't necessarily the same O.D. They go in specific positions and should be marked as such. Definitely follow any directions that come with the packaging.

HTH & Good Luck!...........ed
 

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Rockauto still lists motor mounts, they're cheap:


Of course, those are aftermarket. You might try Jerry Lemond for OE parts.

JLEMOND here or [email protected]. Use caps or large font in deference to Jerry's Old Eyes.
 
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