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Is there a trick to removing the camshaft sprocket from a 3.2 V6 SOHC cylinder head? Tire Automotive tire Automotive design Motor vehicle Tread
After removing the center bolt, I thought the sprocket would easily separate from the camshaft but I mist be missing something obvious. The FSM doesn’t call for a special tool so maybe is just a tight fit? I don’t want to damage the sprocket trying to force it off. Appreciate any advice on how to do this!

as I’m in the process of removing the camshaft assembly to get the heads inspected at a local machine shop.

thanks in advance

Mark
 

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Finally got that stubborn camshaft sprocket removed! Shout oit to Ed Mc. for suggesting heat and prying. Used the wife’s blow dryer to heat up the hub portion of the sprocket for several minutes on high and then used two plastic pry tools to force it off. There’s only about 3/16 in of engagement between the counterbore in the sprocket and the camshaft but it’s a tight fit. The plastic sprocket is actually very stout so you could probably use metal tools to pry it off without damaging it. Back in the disassembly business.
 

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Glad you got it. Looks like that dusting of rust on the camshaft surface was just enough to make a slip fit an interference fit. What a pain! Should have been metal, but I expect a plastic sprocket is cheaper.

Just like outboards, they used to be all aluminum and if a cowling bolt got stuck from salt deposits, well you break out the torch and heat it up. Heat, "persuasion" and maybe a bit of penetrant, and it'll bust loose. Then you scrape out the salt and when you reassemble, a thin coating of Permatex #3 gasket dressing or a bit of waterproof boat bearing grease, and the fastener will never get stuck again.

In the 80's they started using a whole bunch of plastic. It's cheaper and of course does not corrode, but they also used metal inserts in the plastic parts, in order to screw a fastening bolt into it. Guess what happens when that bolt gets stuck? You sure can't torch it, or the part will melt or catch on fire! Makes the job about 10 times tougher and longer to work on things. Dang Cost-Cutters, eh?

Well, Keep Up the Good Work & Carry On Smartly! 😺
 
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