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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi gang,

I'm trying to figure out how to connect a 2003 Isuzu radio/CD unit into my '89 RS using the stock radio plug and wiring harness. I need a source for blade terminals. A photo of the terminal is below.

I want to hook these wires of the new plug:


into this stock radio plug:



using this blade terminal, which I pulled from the stock plug:



I just need to find some of those terminals because I can't re-use the ones I have pulled from the plug. They are crimped really tight.

While I have your attention, check out this photo. 12 V Power and 12 V Memory have me stumped.



As you can see in the next photo, there is battery constant and battery switched. Would 12 V Power and 12 V memory be connected to these two wires? If so, which to which?



Here is a direct link if anyone is interested in viewing more photos.

http://s1178.photobucket.com/albums/x380/whirlybird_1/

I'm trying to keep this as stock plug and play as possible in case I want to re-install the original radio.

Thanks so much for your time.

Jay
 

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I thought you had a adapter for the stock to aftermarket?
If so, just plug in the stock-aftermarket into the stock plug (vehicles), then splice the wires from the stock-aftermarket to the aftermarket (late gen trooper) plug that you bought.
Thats just the part I am not understanding, correct me if I am wrong. Im just having a hard time with what you're trying to do.
To clarify, I dont know what plug is in your second picture. Is that the vehicles plug? I guess the ground is messing me up. :lol:

If you can take a full one pic of the set-up you're trying to accomplish, im sure I could figure it out.

As for the blade connectors, if you cant find them. Just cut the wire with the connector, and splice/solder/heat shrink it to the wire you need terminated.
The stock to aftermarket harness should take out the need to do any of these wiring modifications.

If you have the old stock stereo you could also make your own stock to aftermarket harness. Check this thread out.
http://www.cb7tuner.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=174291
I dont know if its worth the trouble over a store bought harness.

For your power wires...

Memory = 12V constant
Power = 12V switch

Memory needs constant, so you dont lose your radio presets each time the power is cut off. Switched, turns it on and off with the key.

Hope that helps.
 

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Ok, I just looked at your album.

So whats the plug in the second picture you posted in this thread? Is that from the factory?
Cause I also see that it connects to the stock factory plug in the vehicle, which is odd. Unless its aftermarket. :shock:

So I assume it IS another stock factory plug, and it terminates into this... then plugs into your original factory radio?


If so, just disregard that harness and just get yourself one of these to replace it.
Or cut the wires in half and splice them into the haness that you just bought for the '03 stereo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Okay. From left to right, in the photo below:

2003 Radio /new radio plug (thanks to you!) / old stock 1989 Isuzu radio plug (pulled from a dead radio), which plugs into the wiring harness under the dash.



Your idea of just splicing the wires of the new plug to the old radio plug is brilliant. Why didn't I think of that (slapping forehead).

Should I keep that little black box and the fuse that is part of the old radio plug?

Dae said:
I thought you had a adapter for the stock to aftermarket?
If so, just plug in the stock-aftermarket into the stock plug (vehicles), then splice the wires from the stock-aftermarket to the aftermarket (late gen trooper) plug that you bought.
Thats just the part I am not understanding, correct me if I am wrong. Im just having a hard time with what you're trying to do.
To clarify, I dont know what plug is in your second picture. Is that the vehicles plug? I guess the ground is messing me up. :lol:

If you can take a full one pic of the set-up you're trying to accomplish, im sure I could figure it out.

As for the blade connectors, if you cant find them. Just cut the wire with the connector, and splice/solder/heat shrink it to the wire you need terminated.
The stock to aftermarket harness should take out the need to do any of these wiring modifications.

If you have the old stock stereo you could also make your own stock to aftermarket harness. Check this thread out.
http://www.cb7tuner.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=174291
I dont know if its worth the trouble over a store bought harness.

For your power wires...

Memory = 12V constant
Power = 12V switch

Memory needs constant, so you dont lose your radio presets each time the power is cut off. Switched, turns it on and off with the key.

Hope that helps.
 

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Cant you just splice those together, or are there not enough wires?

Im not sure if you have an illumination on the stock harness (in vehicle), you might need to tie that in with the dimmer.
What the heck is that blue wire with the AC adapter loooking thing? :shock:

So the harness in question, that you want to put pins in... was it terminated, with the two white plastic molex things? And you cut it off?

If so, you're halfway there! :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's quite simple. I'll use fewer words.

I want to connect the new plug to the old plug.

I hoped to find flat blade terminals, but you offered a suggestion which is brilliantly simple. Splice the wires together. duh.



I don't know what the black box or the fuse is for but I'm thinking I should keep it in line.

The extra wires are for dimmer, electric antenna, and one other thing I can't recall. There is an illumination wire, so no problems there.

Forget the molex things. They were plugged into the old dead radio, and of no use. I could have cut those wires, but chose to take the old radio apart to pull the plugs intact.

Dae said:
Cant you just splice those together, or are there not enough wires?

Im not sure if you have an illumination on the stock harness (in vehicle), you might need to tie that in with the dimmer.
What the heck is that blue wire with the AC adapter loooking thing? :shock:

So the harness in question, that you want to put pins in... it was terminated, with the two white plastic molex things? And you cut it off?

If so, you're halfway there! :lol:
 

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Yup, just splice it be done with it. Solder and heat shrink recomended for reliability.
Im curious as to what that black box is for. Where does it correspond onto the vehicles wiring?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Don't know what the little black thingy is for. The Factory Repair Manual doesn't have any info. I may post to general discussion to get some feedback. Maybe it's some sort of noise suppressor?

Definitely going with heat shrink and solder. I like clean electricals. I'll post photos when it's done.

Thanks for the input.

Dae said:
Yup, just splice it be done with it. Solder and heat shrink recomended for reliability.
Im curious as to what that black box is for. Where does it correspond onto the vehicles wiring?
 

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Jay,

Per my '89 Amigo (TC) Electrical Troubleshooting Manual says it is a " Radio in-line filter". The symbol is that of an radio type choke coil, which, in this application is as you guessed, for radio noise suppression!

Believe similar unit of the same year 'Zu are probably identical. Manual suggests the wire in and out of the choke are BLU/RED and connect between the "ignition input" of the radio and the 3A in-line radio fuse.

Hope this helps,

GB :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hey GB,

If this little black box is a noise suppressor it's redundant because the Factory Service Manual shows a radio noise suppressor in the Alternator. The little black box is fused. Why do you think that is?

I took the little black box apart and found this:





What the heck is this thing?

gb89amigo said:
Jay,

Per my '89 Amigo (TC) Electrical Troubleshooting Manual says it is a " Radio in-line filter". The symbol is that of an radio type choke coil, which, in this application is as you guessed, for radio noise suppression!

Believe similar unit of the same year 'Zu are probably identical. Manual suggests the wire in and out of the choke are BLU/RED and connect between the "ignition input" of the radio and the 3A in-line radio fuse.

Hope this helps,

GB :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Made some progress on the radio plug splicing. Ran out of heat shrink so only got the speaker wires soldered together.

One thing that's really weird is the stock radio ground wire plugs into a blank hole in the body radio harness. In other words the ground is connected to nothing. It's a male plug with no corresponding female plug/wire. I'm thinking of grounding the new radio to the dash. Wadda y'all think? The stock radio works now, so is there any need to ground the replacement radio?





More photos here:
http://s1178.photobucket.com/albums/x38 ... 20project/

Jay said:
Don't know what the little black thingy is for. The Factory Repair Manual doesn't have any info. I may post to general discussion to get some feedback. Maybe it's some sort of noise suppressor?

Definitely going with heat shrink and solder. I like clean electricals. I'll post photos when it's done.

Thanks for the input.

Dae said:
Yup, just splice it be done with it. Solder and heat shrink recomended for reliability.
Im curious as to what that black box is for. Where does it correspond onto the vehicles wiring?
 

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Jay,

The noise suppression capacitor associated with the alternator is, generally, to curtail alternator "whine", possible occasional voltage spikes, not just for the protection of the radio, but can offer protection for the ECM as well. As "whine" and spurious voltage spikes are AC in nature, the capacitor value is selected to short these specific components to ground if/when they occur.

The transformer-looking device you found in the black plastic box, is a choke in series with the power source, offering additional noise suppression to the radio.
Today's radio suppression chokes are much smaller and may be found in "chip" form, inside the radio proper. These chokes are needed as the vehicle wiring can act as an antenna, picking up ignition spark noise and external sources.

Sometimes, in extreme cases, a capacitor may be added across the incoming power lead at the radio, carefully grounding the capacitor!

Other noise suppression may be realized by making sure ALL ground straps are in place and in good shape. Many vehicles have their metal hoods grounded to the body to help curtail spark emissions to the radio's antenna.

The engineers in this forum may have a more definitive explanation and/or correct any errors.

Hope this helps,

GB :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wow, thanks for that excellent information! I get it.

Do you think this Isuzu/Clarion radio has a built in suppressor chip,






Allowing me to eliminate this original suppressor from the new wiring adapter I'm making?



Thank you again. I'm a wee bit smarter about electrical now.


gb89amigo said:
Jay,

The noise suppression capacitor associated with the alternator is, generally, to curtail alternator "whine", possible occasional voltage spikes, not just for the protection of the radio, but can offer protection for the ECM as well. As "whine" and spurious voltage spikes are AC in nature, the capacitor value is selected to short these specific components to ground if/when they occur.

The transformer-looking device you found in the black plastic box, is a choke in series with the power source, offering additional noise suppression to the radio.
Today's radio suppression chokes are much smaller and may be found in "chip" form, inside the radio proper. These chokes are needed as the vehicle wiring can act as an antenna, picking up ignition spark noise and external sources.

Sometimes, in extreme cases, a capacitor may be added across the incoming power lead at the radio, carefully grounding the capacitor!

Other noise suppression may be realized by making sure ALL ground straps are in place and in good shape. Many vehicles have their metal hoods grounded to the body to help curtail spark emissions to the radio's antenna.

The engineers in this forum may have a more definitive explanation and/or correct any errors.

Hope this helps,

GB :)
 

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Id guess it has it built in. My Rodeo doesnt have that line supressor anywhere. If anything you can leave it off, and if you get noise, put it back on.
 

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I dont see a need for the fuse or supressor. Aftermarket harnesses dont have it.
So maybe they were needed for stock systems on older vehicles, and are now standard in newer stereos.

Maybe someone else can chime in. But I doubt the 2003 Trooper came with those, and dont see a need for it unless you experience noise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Okay then. Thanks for the input. I am totally happy to eliminate that cumbersome little s.o.b.

Dae said:
I dont see a need for the fuse or supressor. Aftermarket harnesses dont have it.
So maybe they were needed for stock systems on older vehicles, and are now standard in newer stereos.

Maybe someone else can chime in. But I doubt the 2003 Trooper came with those, and dont see a need for it unless you experience noise.
 
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