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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought this Trooper over a year ago and have posted up bits and pieces. I am gonna try to get most of the mods so far posted up here.

Here is stinky parked next to the Taco right after coming home. The previous owners used to chain smoke inside the thing and it stunk so bad that I used to get a headache everytime I worked on it or drove it. Thus the stinky moniker.

Phuck Photo Bucket

After about 3000 miles of driving -right around 200k on the Tacho, the cylinder head went. I replaced it with a new AMC-casting. At the same time I replaced the radiator, waterpump, timing belt, tensioner, coolant hoses and vacuum lines. In addition I did the smog pump delete and made a new wire harness for the fuel management portion of the under-hood wiring. I didn't take any pictures of this stuff, because it isn't really all that exciting.

I did take pictures while doing these projects and I will post them up in the next couple of minutes:

1. Aftermarket seat additions
2. Re-covering door cards
3. York OBA with relay, pressure switch and tank
4. New tires and rear springs
5. Miscellaneous: fire extinguisher, hi-lift mount, rack, clutch switch over ride

EDIT: some of the posts below are lifted directly from other threads of mine. So, my apologies for double posting, but my goal was to get everything in one place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
So, I had been wanting to get rid of the seats in my Trooper for two reasons.

One: They stink. The previous owner was a chain smoker as was his wife. It seems they chain smoked with the windows up for years in the car. Blech. The first couple of times I worked on or drove in the Trooper it made me truly ill -as in lying in bed sick the next day ill. As a result I gutted the entire Trooper interior of everything but headliner, seat belts and front seats.

Two: I also have a bad back and wanted some newer more orthopedically correct seats.

I choose PRP Premier seats and ordered them in gray Cordura from Trent Fab. Driver side is 4 inches taller and has an inflatable lumbar support.

Here is pic of the seat on the floor next to the stock seat. Proportions are very close. PRP seat is a little taller.



I made a fairly simple adapter to fit between the stock sliders and the seat out of some 0.120" 2x2 angle iron. I can shoot some photos of that if anyone wants when I disassemble the whole thing for trimming and paint.

Here is a pic of my dirty bare floor that some folk find unseemly. The point here is that I was able to use the bolt holes already in the sliders.



Here is the front view. I mounted the driver seat such that I could push it 3 inches further back than the stock configuration allowed me. Good for me, but bad for folks in the back. Actually gonna need an aftermarket bench for the back too.



In the back you can see how close the seat gets to the step.



You can also see part of the mounts. Those need to come out again, get more rounded edges and some paint. The color does not match, but I wasn't too concerned about the Troopers "colorways" when I order theses seats and PRP does not offer tan Cordura...

Next up is new seat belts. I am just going to with regular old three point, but without a retraction mechanism. Then the interior is nearly all new with the exception of the dash pad and the headliner. You can see the new door cards a little in some of the shots.

Most aftermarket seats are generally attached via 4 vertical mounting tabs: PRP (14x18), Mastercraft (14x16), some Corbeau Baja seats (14x18). The PRP tabs are spaced 14" side to side and 18" front to back. The tabs are oriented such that the bolts are horizontal and aligned left to right (relative to the car). The bolts that hold the seats in a trooper are spaced 15" side to side and 11 3/4" front to back. (I am sure the actual dimensions are in mm, but this is close enough.) The adapters that I made have both of these hole patterns on them. I may add some other holes in the future so that the seats can be tilted or raised/lowered a little.

Here are the adapters painted and trimmed. I wanted to eliminate sharp corners and edges for obvious reasons:


The adapters bolt right to the sliders. It is a lot easier to do this out of the trooper. As you can see I just re-used the stock hardware from the seat mounts. I did have to get M6 nuts because the stock ones are welded to the seat bases:


Sliders and adapters mounted to the seat:


Finally here is a pic of both seats mounted in the trooper. I wonder if I shoulda got the passenger side in extra tall too. Now the wife will have a great excuse for me to do all the driving. Too late now:


Close up of the back left corner of the passenger side slider, adapter and seat tab. The great factory paint job is also visible here -burgundy floor and tan seat pedestals. I suppose that was covered by carpet went it rolled out of the factory:


Thanks for looking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
OK. I found some pictures of the when I re-did the door card covers. Looking at the photos, it seems that I did the door cards before the seats. I really thought that I did the seats first...getting old.

Here is the driver's side door card removed and ready to get stripped down. The reason I cut away the fabric around the window crank was to access the spring clip that holds the crank in place. You can see looking at the upholstery how filthy the car was. The black ring around the cut-out for the door latch is cigarette ashes!



Here is the door without the card. From the factory the doors had a clear plastic seal on the inside to keep dust and moisture out of the cab. The old plastic was torn and brittle, so I ripped it out.



I resealed the door using heavy duty outdoor vapor-barrier and duct tape. Looks a little ghetto, but it serves it purpose and is hidden by the door cards anyway.



I used marine-vinyl to cover the cards once they were stripped of the old upholstery. I used hot glue to attach the vinyl to the cards. A couple of key points were corners and timing. Practice corners and have a good method for doing them. I used an approximate copy of pattern that was used at the factory. If you are sloppy about folding the corners, they will bunch up and the cards will bow out. I did this project in the dead of winter. Thus, I had to be really fast about applying the hot glue and then getting the covering on the card. Otherwise the glue was already hard. This is the driver's door complete.



Here is a view of the back driver's corner with re-covered cards and high-lift mount. Very clean looking high-lift...looks a little more broken in these days.

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
As the Trooper sees more and more time offroad and after a near stuck on the beach, I decided it was time to have the ability to airdown for offroad driving and air-back-up for on road driving. I looked at the viair medium duty system (rated for 31" tires) and decided for $288 I would DIY an OBA system instead of buying one.

One of the factors in this decision was output/duty cycle. Electric pumps are slow and can't run continuously. So I decided with a DIY system I could use a pump driven by the motor like a York.

Mounting up York compressors for OBA systems is pretty common, but in searching here on the planet I could not find anyone who did it and had photos, etc. So here is a quick account of my go at it.

PHASE I - getting the pump mounted aka "the easy part"


When I first got my trooper, I pulled the AIR system, so I had room and some brackets for an OBA system. Last week I picked up a pump from a motor home with a BB Chrysler at the local recyclers. Grounding the body and applying 12v to the clutch wire showed that the clutch was good. Spinning the part of the clutch attached to the crankshaft indicated that the pump was pumping ok too.

The York can be mounted vertically or horizontally, but in the trooper it fits best vertically. The bottom, left and right sides of the york hav 4 x 5/8" threaded holes that are for mounting the pump. Of course, some type of adapter bracket is needed to get one in the trooper. I decided to make one that would make use of the pivot bracket that I already had from the old air pump.

The emissions pump tensioner arm can also be reused. To do this a mounting point needs to be fabbed for the York and somewhere on the motor. I chose the two threaded holes at the front of the cylinder head.

All in all I need to make three brackets / adapters / mounting points:

1. Compressor bottom - from the bottom of the YOrk to the pivot from the old air pump (top left)
2. Compressor side - from the side of the york to the tensioner arm from the old air pump (bottom left)
3. Cylinder head - from the cylinder head to the other side of the tensioner arm. (bottom right)

You can see these three brackets, the tensioner arm (top right) and the pivot (bottom center) here. The brackets are all made from 3/16 angle. The only tools needed were a drill, sawzall, angle grinder and a 110V flux core welder.



Here you can see the compressor bottom and side brackets attached to the compressor. The hole in the bottom of the lower bracket is for the long bolt that goes through the pivot bracket. It is tough to see, but there is a .125 wall tube on the bracket that the bolt goes through. The other two holes are speed holes aka "measure once; cut twice..." :roll:

\

A 1/2" x 28" belt from Napa got the pump hooked up to the the extra pulley on the fan. A 29 inch belt may be better, because the pump does sit slightly clocked (5 degrees or so). However, the hood still closes with plenty of spare room. The hose on the right is the intake. The fitting on the left is the high pressure side. I cycled the motor up to 4500 rpms a couple of times and the everything is rock solid. Clearance to the exhaust manifold is as large as I could make it without the compressor hitting the hose coming off the MAF.



PHASE II - plumbing & wiring

I am waiting on parts for this. Should be done in about two weeks. Rough outline of the plan:

All on one manifold under the hood:
175 psi safety valve
110/ 150 psi high / low pressure switch with relay
checkvalve
pressure gauge

Right after the manifold will be an inline oil / moisture / particle filter. Copper tube will lead to a 2.5 gallon tank under step in the rear floor. For now the plan is to have a single quick connect either under the truck or poking through the step behind the front drivers seat.

Main power will be controlled by an in-cab toggle switch to the low power (obviously) side of the relay.

Phase I was pretty easy. Phase II will be a little more work, but nothing terribly difficult. So far with compressor, plumbing, wiring, flare tool, tank and 1/4 npt tap I am barely under budget. By time I get the copper tubing, a handful of fittings and the toggle switch that I still need, I will probably be right at the cost of the viair system.

I got the switch and solenoid wired up. The power for both comes from the number 7 position on the fuse panel. You can tap into that, if you dont have power locks, right above the hood release handle. The six pole connector with 4 light green, 1 pink and 1 black wire is for the power locks. I used the simplest cheapest toggle I could find at radioshack. Unfortunately, even the simplest switch these days is fancy, I just wanted a plain old toggle switch.


Above: Toggle switch for compressor relay. Man is my trooper dusty.


Above: The switch I really wanted. I had this one in my tool box. I found the same type on the interweb, but they were like 6 bucks plus 5 more for shipping! Really?!? Btw, this one is the relocated clutch safety switch.

The relay also contained the pressure switch. So I needed a little room to mount it. Behind the drives headlight worked well.


Above: Relay-Pressure switch combo.

Here is the highpressure hydro hose from the compressor to the manifold. From left to right the items on the manifold are: 150 psi blow off, pressure gauge, quick connect, line to the pressure switch. Eventually the quick connect will be replaced by the blow off and in place of the blow off will be the line to the tank. Between the manifold and the tank there will also be a filter and check valve. I will have an extra blow off on the tank too.


Above: compressor to manifold.

I was able to run the copper tube from the manifold to the pressure switch with only one minor hang-up. The arm on the hood hinge nests exactly where I had the line running. Luckily the tubing is so soft that things just self clearanced. After the self-clearance bent the tube further out of the way so the hinge wouldn't rub through the copper line. I just happened to have some loom-holders from Del-city in the garage that worked perfect for mounting the copper line. I was able to run the line thorough the holders and attach the holder to the bolts holding the inner and outer fenders together. I thought that was pretty a pretty lucky fit.

You can also see the filter (muffler) from the AIR setup that I repurposed as a filter. You can actually crack the housings open and change the "element."


Above: overview of the setup.

It seems to work well although without a tank the flow rate is pretty small. If I prop the throttle open, I can, however, run a 1/2" impact wrench enough to get my lug nuts off... I was also very impressed that the motor could idle right up to 120 psi and hold it without getting bogged down.

Phase III - tank & final plumbing

This has been done for a while now. There were some mods made to the manifold under the hood to make things fit better. The copper tuning was way too much of a pain in the *** -someone here warned me about that and I wish I had listened. :roll: So, I used 300 psi from a hose I had in the garage with a damaged end.

[under hood pic coming soon]

Mounted the tank right under the rear step.

[tank pic coming soon]

Quick connect for airing up tires is just inside the rear driver's door. I am not too worried about folks stepping on this, since I only have front seats...

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Before new tires or springs:



new tires with old springs in the back. The front suspension is also resting on the compression bump stop!N



New tires, new springs, equal spacing between droop and compression bumps up front.



The OME Dakar springs netted the Trooper 2.5" of lift. I measured the spacing from the bump top to axle before install at 2.25". After install I had 4.75 between the bump stop and the axle tube. I cranked the torsion bar bolt 8 turns - I think that was it...1/4" per turn, right? One way or the other, I gained about 2.5" up front at ride height.

The OME Dakar install went pretty painlessly. The biggest hassle in my mind was the damned e-brake line mounts. I still haven't put them back on, because I ran out of patience. The biggest disappointment was that 2 out of 4 of the u-bolts that ARB drop shipped me were the wrong size. Bend diameter was OK, but the threads bottomed out before the u-bolts were tight.

I wanted to do the spring swap with as little dis-assembly as possible. I found that with jack stands in front of the front leaf spring hanger, all I had to do was unbolt the shackles, the u-bolts, e-brake holder and front bushing.



For re-assembly order of operation was important:

1. Put car in in 4-lo, reverse and lock handbrake (even though car was on jackstands, tires were still on the ground)
2. Line up center pin to axle (use a small roll-around jack, but remember to put lower u-bolt plate between jack and springs) and attach u-bolts.
3. Use crow bar to line up spring with shackles
4. Release handbrake
5. Use tire (fore-aft) and crowbar (up-down) to line up front hanger bolt.

The first side took me about 30 minutes to get the spring mounted, because I didn't follow the above order. The second side took me all of 5 minutes...those damned e-brake mounts are gonna prolly take me two hours tonight!

Driverside mounted:



You can see how much longer the u-bolts on the d-side are. These were the wrong bolts, I had to put an extra washer on them to get them tight. Not sure why differential fill plug is seeping...wonder if my breather is clogged. Did not notice it working of the car, but it sure shows up in the photos.



Gratuitous old and new shot.



With the ridiculous rack on top, the trooper does not fit in the garage, so I had to work half-outside in the rain. Impact wrench, BFH, crowbar and zero-rust helped make this project go very fast, though.



EDIT: The E-brake cable guide / mount was actually easy to do once I pulled the wheel. Trimming the u-bolts to length was annoying and relatively expensive. I couldn't get a cutoff wheel close enough to the nut for a good trim and the cheapo "metal" sawzall blades would barely cut the u-bolts. It took me 4 x $5 blades to get things trimmed up. Not tragic, but annoying. Oh yeah, here are those e-brake mounts that I was whining about:

 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just because the rack is too big not to use it. Four bins on top and plenty of room for dogs, cooler, chainsaw, stove, 10 gallons of water, etc. inside.



It used to get pretty crowded in the back before the big rack...and no, I did not make here ride back there.



Best feature ever on a trooper: built in bottle opener. You can see the cooking platform on the back door in this pic as well.



EDIT: Another piece of miscellany that I snapped a photo of this afternoon. Trying to figure out where to unobtrusively put another bigger unit.

 

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Goodness, what do you do in your spare time? :lol: Very, very nice work. Please mail me those old, pristine seat covers.
 

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Great thread. You've got some really cool ideas
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Shooter & Stusvend,

Thank you guys. Gotten some good advise and ideas from you guys as well. Shooter, I think you saved me a lot of work and stress one time chasing down a loose connection to my fuel pump.
 

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chuffer said:
Shooter & Stusvend,

Thank you guys. Gotten some good advise and ideas from you guys as well. Shooter, I think you saved me a lot of work and stress one time chasing down a loose connection to my fuel pump.
Good deal. You sure do nice work and and demonstrate excellent writing and photography skills.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, maybe the Trooper does need a little help with the 33s. Might even have time to install this on the weekend. Brown Santa should be bringing another bolt-on goody Thursday too.

 

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What kind of cam are you putting into the 2.6L ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the comments all. I was hoping to have some updates today, but it was a rough weekend in the garage:

Took me way longer than I expected to get the Delta cam in.

I was planning to do add the Pace Setter header at the same time, but ran into a couple of fitment issues that I need to work out first. The cylinder-head mounting flange needs to be ground flat, heater pipe needs to be bent out of the way and the flanges on the header & flex coupler don't match or line up. I also have to slightly adjust the mounting of the York compressor for the header to fit. Nothing really tragic, but the heater pipe worries me...

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=57576

And I discovered that that ridiculous rack has dented the roof above the rain gutters. It must flex like crazy offroad or something. I have yet to figure out exactly what is happening, but it appears that the towers are swaying enough to hit roof.
 
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