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Discussion Starter · #41 ·
All righty now we are making progress. The nut in question is 22 mm and I did not have a combo wrench in that size, however I do now! :mrgreen: Oddly after soaking overnight in penetrating oil it broke free fairly easily. Head is now off the vehicle, so now on to other new problems to solve:

How the heck do you get the intake/ITEC off the head?? I removed four bolts and two nuts and I cannot find any other fasteners. Am I missing something. Did not want to smack it around until I posted here. I think the head is toast so if the thing is just stuck I can probably pry it without worrying about head damage. I'll let you be the judge from the pics.

A little explanation on the oil you see in the first pic: The oil was low when I got it so I added some before I started monkeying with it, checking compression etc. I think the oil I put in just ran back into the number 3 cylinder. I guess the good news is it was still pooled there. I do not see any obvious problems with the block or pistons other than some scoring on cylinder number 2.

The head on the other hand looks bad. You can see the pitting, erosion around the spark plugs as well as a chunk of aluminum missing right where the gasket sits. Please point out any other obvious things you advanced mechanics notice here. I have already resigned myself to get a new head at a minimum.

Thanks
Alan
 

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That head is really chewed! Ready for the scrap bin, for sure. How bad are the cylinders scored? Really deep, or just fine lines? Can you catch the scoring with your fingernail? If so, you might seriously think about tearing it down for a rebuld. The block might need to be bored out & fitted with oversized pistons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
I'll have to go back out and look at it in the daylight. I only saw the scoring on #2 shown in the picture but will give a better inspection tomorrow. Couple of novice questions;

Any way you can tell from the pictures or castings etc if this is the OEM head & gasket?

What causes the erosion of the aluminum around the valve seats, spark plugs and that one spot along the gasket?

Lastly, am I missing any fasteners on the intake/ITEC? Pulled four bolts and two nuts off of it. Still stuck tight.

Thanks
Alan
 

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giusedtobe said:
I'll have to go back out and look at it in the daylight. I only saw the scoring on #2 shown in the picture but will give a better inspection tomorrow. Couple of novice questions;

Any way you can tell from the pictures or castings etc if this is the OEM head & gasket?

What causes the erosion of the aluminum around the valve seats, spark plugs and that one spot along the gasket?

Lastly, am I missing any fasteners on the intake/ITEC? Pulled four bolts and two nuts off of it. Still stuck tight.

Thanks
Alan
I dunno if there's a way to tell, if you can't find any markings on it (not likely now), the OE gaskets are dark in color and some of the aftermarket ones are more red/orange, but that doesn't mean much.

That type of erosion might be from steam (water leaks in the combustion chamber), or really bad detonation. The one where the fire ring seals, is from combustion pressures leaking past the steel ring, and "undercutting" the softer aluminum head in the process.

Does the block's sealing surface look OK? You'll want to scrape it with a really sharp razor blade. I've used paint scrapers in the past with success and Wal-Mart has some pretty cheap ones, just pick one up and a set of extra blades and you're good. It helps to spray a bit of light lube on the block when you're scraping, makes it go a bit smoother.

Don't use those Scotch-Brite discs that you chuck into a drill motor; the abrasive goes everywhere. When you're cleaning the block, stuff a small piece of rag or paper towel down the oil passages in the top of the block, that'll help keep any crud outa there. Be sure to pull them out when you're done! Turn the crankshaft so all of the pistons are down in the cylinders, then stuff shop rags or paper towels in the cylinders to help keep the crud out of them, too.

Of course if you end up tearing the block apart all that'll be a moot point!

There should be (2) fasteners per cylinder on the intake manifold. So (8) total. I don't recall having any issues with my Spacecab 2.6 other than they're a Beetch to get at!

I did read on another thread that it's a bit easier to pull the intake off the head, if you remove the upper half of the ITEC manifold assembly first. Then you can get at all the bolts better. Be sure to make diagrams and/or take lots of pictures!

This thread has a few tips for getting that pesky intake busted loose:

https://forum.planetisuzoo.com/viewtopi ... take+upper

HTH..........ed
 

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giusedtobe said:
Lastly, am I missing any fasteners on the intake/ITEC? Pulled four bolts and two nuts off of it. Still stuck tight.
Get a bigger hammer. ;) Just kidding, there are two nuts that are pretty buried in there. If you look on the back side of the intake you should see one of them, it can be removed with a box wrench - note the intake/cylinder head in these pictures is upside down from it's normal position when secured to the block:



The other is almost smack dab in the middle and can reached with a ratchet on an extension:



As Ed mentioned, if you remove the ITEC portion it makes these a lot easier to reach, but technically can be done either way.

Sorry to hear you're running into damage, hang in there!

Jonathan
 

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shaggydoink said:
giusedtobe said:
Lastly, am I missing any fasteners on the intake/ITEC? Pulled four bolts and two nuts off of it. Still stuck tight.
there are two nuts that are pretty buried in there. Jonathan
Yep, from what I remember there are 4 bolts and 4 nuts. Two of the nuts are hard to see.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Hello gents. Well I finally got the intake manifold off the head. There was that one pesky nut left buried in there to remove. (the one you guys were trying to point out I am sure)

So now that the head is off and obviously need to be replaced, I have a couple more dumb questions:

1. Assume you have to remove the studs from the head to reuse in the new head. Or do the heads come with studs attached? If they need to be removed, any tips?

2. The engine has 174K on it and other than the problems I've shared here, I know nothing about the history of this engine. I am ok with replacing or rebuilding this engine if it comes to that but my concern is since I do not have a baseline with this engine I am wondering if it might make more sense to replace the head, timing belt, water pump, thermostat, hoses, belts, plug wires etc. and get the engine running so I can evaluate all of the other systems. My thought process is that this way I can find out if there are other major problems without risking a new rebuilt engine. If I can get it running and driving then I can work through other shortcomings so that when I do rebuild/replace the engine everything will be like new when complete. Does this make sense?

Thanks
Alan
 

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My head came without studs, so I re-used the old ones. Double-nut them and then back them out. Hopefully they'll come out easy. If it were me I'd replace timing belt and tensioner, water pump, all hoses (coolant, heater, and vacuum), the things that would be a chore to replace later. Rotor, cap, plugs, and plug wires if they look like they need it. But they won't be too hard to get to later. Hopefully you'll get lucky and you'll have a sweet running engine. If it turns out you do have to rebuild it, you're only out your time. my $.02

Mike
 

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Congratulations on tackling the intake! I hope your reward beverage was the Maker's Mark and not the Roundup. ;)

I like Mike's approach. Some items would definitely be worth doing since you've torn things back to the point you're at such as the timing belt and water pump - the coolant hoses would be wise to at least remove and inspect (and replace if needed) since the system is currently drained. The other items you mentioned are usually good "new owner" things to do as well, although some could wait if your time and/or money are a little stretched.

Jonathan
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
I was afraid of that on the studs! So that leads to another stupid question; are the studs bottomed out? I assume they are otherwise you'd have to measure how far they need to protrude. I know this is a really stupid question but this entire process is OJT for me as this is the first head I have pulled.

Any need to use anti-seize on the studs when they go in the new head?
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
shaggydoink said:
Congratulations on tackling the intake! I hope your reward beverage was the Maker's Mark and not the Roundup. ;)
Jonathan
Haven't tried the Roundup yet but if I get into too much Makers then I might hit it by mistake! :drunken: I better move it. Lol

BTW I am always short $ & time but I figure even if I pay a few grand for parts etc and wind up with a good running little truck I'm still ahead of anything else I might have picked up to be a little knock around/off road vehicle. I'm also looking at as an opportunity to learn a little more mechanically. That's where you guys come in and I appreciate all the help.

Regards,
Alan
 

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giusedtobe said:
I was afraid of that on the studs! So that leads to another stupid question; are the studs bottomed out? I assume they are otherwise you'd have to measure how far they need to protrude. I know this is a really stupid question but this entire process is OJT for me as this is the first head I have pulled.

Any need to use anti-seize on the studs when they go in the new head?
As O.P. suggested you can double-nut the stud, lock those 2 nuts together using 2 wrenches, then torque on the inside nut (the one closet to the cyl head) and back out the stud without damaging it.

Stud extractor tools also do that job nicely and here's one at Amazon for around $14 that would do the trick:

https://www.amazon.com/Performance-Tool ... B01GGV1UWI

When you reinstall studs, use the double-nut method. The stud will bottom out on the middle "shoulder". They probably don't really need lube when screwing them in, but it certainly won't hurt and likely they'll go in a bit more smoothly.

BTW most studs are shorter on one end, IIRC the short end of the stud screws into the head. Just take note of how they go when you take 'em out, and make sure they go back the same way.
 

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Don't be in a big haste to toss that old head. If you use Clearwater (AKA Odessa), they may still want it for a core. They can do miracles with damaged heads. On the studs, I double nut them to remove and install (place 2 nuts together and tighten them against each other to jam them together then turn one with a wrench to remove or install. IIRC, the studs are bottomed. If it's aluminum, never seize is your friend. We'll coach you through everything you need to get this rig running (and there will be plenty of learning, and plenty of knowledge here to share - especially when it comes to assembly time).
A note of caution: before you go too deep (in the project or the pockets). Have you checked the engine thrust bearings? Push the harmonic balancer (or end of the crank if you have the balancer off already), anyway, push back towards the rear. Now LIGHTLY pry or pull forward. If it moves considerably (like about 1/8") the block is toast. if it barely moves, count your blessings, your bearings are good. I echo Ed's advice: if you've gone this far, consider pulling the block and doing a re-ring and bearing job on it. I did a valve job on mine (years ago) and the time it had been driven by the P.O. with burnt valves ruined the rings on a cylinder. If you opt for the re-ring job, PM me. Dennis

EDIT: while I was typing, ED beat me to some of the info. D.
 

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giusedtobe said:
I'm also looking at as an opportunity to learn a little more mechanically.
I can truly appreciate this, I continue to learn and grow through the generosity of other members here on the Planet... and make dumb mistakes... which is supposed to be part of learning right? :roll:

Jonathan

p.s: I'm a "bourbon guy" myself, I like how you roll. :mrgreen:
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
I'll try the double nut method to get the studs out. I'll let it soak in penetrating oil for a day or so. Obviously the exhaust side is rusty but the manifold nuts cam off fairly easy so I'll cross my finger on the studs. Going to have to replace one of them anyway as its sheared off.

So I did the test on the crankshaft bearings and if I did it right they should be good. I grabbed the harmonic balancer and pushed it forward and then pulled it back as hard as I could and the truck moved but the balancer did not move at all. Of course this leads to another question for the best way to remove the harmonic balancer. I have a breaker bar and the right sized socket. Haynes manual says put it in high gear and apply the parking brake and then use a gear puller once the nut is off. Is this the best way? Also I don't have a gear puller but wonder if that is one of the tools you can borrow from the auto parts store?
 

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Of course this leads to another question for the best way to remove the harmonic balancer. I have a breaker bar and the right sized socket

This worked for me, and others here to as I posed the same question when I first removed mine, You can use the starter to break loose the nut. Pull the fuel pump relay to prevent fuel pump from running. Place the breaker bar as shown in the picture.
The breaker bar has to be under the frame so when the engine turns it won't. I used a zip tie on the handle to hold it in place. Put it in neutral and just TAP the starter.
 

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I've had some instances where the bolt has come loose without much effort, and others where it was frozen solid - the method Harry mentioned is definitely a quick and easy way to go for these. If you can't spark the engine like this for some reason and the high gear / parking break don't offer enough resistance, you can also use the bolt holes that typically hold one of the belt bell thingies on (already removed in Harry's picture it appears) to rig up a little extra hold... which I'll admit is a little ghetto, but how I had to do things once.

Auto stores usually have a wheel puller in their collection of loaner tools, or for $15-20 you can just buy one - most can used on other things as well like the steering wheel as an example, so a pretty good investment if you plan to do more work on the truck down the road.

Keep up the good work! :thumbup:

Jonathan
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
Jonathan since I am still in the decision making process on how I proceed I am curious about a few things. I noticed you have a one car garage you are working in which is the same for me. Seems like I saw you are rebuilding or rebuilt an engine and space available or lack thereof is one of my concerns. Did you pull the engine and replace it outside on the drive?

Also, I figure that while I am replacing the head or rebuilding I might as well go with a hopped up cam. I e-mailed Jerry a while back with no response. Do you know where I can source a Jerry cam or the other hopped cam I saw on this forum?

Thanks
Alan
 

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Great news on the thrust bearings. The starter bump method is almost always the best. Once the bolt is off, sometimes, the balancer can easily be wiggled off, other times a puller is necessary. You'll only want to pull from the INSIDE part of the balancer (there should already be bolt holes there for the pulleys to bolt up to, use those holes). Before you remove the balancer, roll the crank so that the #1 piston is at TDC. Check to see if the timing mark on the balancer lines up with the zero on the cover. These balancers are known for slipping (slipping is where the outer "ring" on the balancer moves in relation to the center that is keyed to the crank.)
Oh. One other thing: when you get the balancer off, make careful note of the order that the crank timing sprocket and washer are and which side of the sprocket faces out. This is often a headache for first timer timing or seal replacers. Be very careful removing the sprocket. The little shoulder cracks easily (ask me how I know :wink:) Dennis
 
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