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Nice find. Head gasket failures are fairly common on the 2.6 engine, especially if overheated. The number 3 and number 9 fuse counting from the right are missing on my 89 and the relay that's missing on yours, I think is for power windows, a feature that I didn't know was even offered on the Gen. one Troopers. Welcome here, a place where we're all friendly and helpful.
 

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giusedtobe said:
Yeah I am hoping its just a blown head gasket but you never know when you buy a non runner. I hooked up a battery to it and all the lights and accessories worked. I did not hear a fuel pump buzz when the ignition came on. Assume these have an in tank pump? Can you hear it activate when you turn on the ignition like some do?
Yes, they have an in tank pump. Some times a previous owner will have cut a hole under the back mat to access the pump, otherwise the tank has to be dropped. As to the head gasket, assuming the engine can be cranked, a compression check should confirm a blown head gasket.
 

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Good thing I already ordered a head gasket!

Hopefully the head gasket is a fel-pro or an OEM gasket. Others have failed prematurely. In fact I'll say I've done four head gaskets, one on the 1.9 engine, one on a 2.3, one on a 2.6, and the other on a 2.2 in a 2000 Amigo. I used one OEM and the other 3 were fel-pro's. All 4 turned out good. Also, you should replace the water pump and timing belt and tensioner while your there, along with new water hoses and vacuum lines.
 

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. Did I read right that you have to pull the harmonic balancer to to get at a couple of the water pump bolts??

There is at least one bolt that's behind the lower timing cover. So to remove the lower timing cover, yes, the balancer must be removed. I replaced a water pump once by taking all the bolts out of the lower timing cover and bending it out to remove that one bolt. Wasn't easy but it did work. You can use the engine starter to break loose the nut. If you need to do that I can post a pic of the breaker bar and socket and some more info. The nut is a 24 mm. A 15/16 will also fit.
 

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I think it's easier to unbolt the manifold and leave the exhaust pipe connected. The nuts on the manifold studs where the exhaust pipe connects are usually really rusty and it's possible you'll snap off a stud, and who likes laying underneath and having rust particles fall into your eyes anyway. And yes the balancer will only go on one way. I'll enclose a pic so you can see the woodruff key.
 

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Might also mention there is a bolt about midway between the two manifolds, right behind the head that when you have both ends loose still has to be removed. My opinion on the best wrench on the exhaust nut would be a metric flare nut wrench and a six point one at that. You don't want to round off that nut. I know what your facing. When I secured the 2.3 intake for my weber conversion (junk yard) I couldn't break loose that same nut on either end and had to saw the line in two using just the blade of my hacksaw. I was there almost 3 hours removing the intake. All's I can say is good luck. The heat sounds like your best bet.
 

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Of course this leads to another question for the best way to remove the harmonic balancer. I have a breaker bar and the right sized socket

This worked for me, and others here to as I posed the same question when I first removed mine, You can use the starter to break loose the nut. Pull the fuel pump relay to prevent fuel pump from running. Place the breaker bar as shown in the picture.
The breaker bar has to be under the frame so when the engine turns it won't. I used a zip tie on the handle to hold it in place. Put it in neutral and just TAP the starter.
 

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The needle bearing looks the size of the pilot bushing for the input shaft of the manual tranny that goes into the flywheel.
 

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giusedtobe said:
So I started the beast and it does indeed live and breath albeit roughly. So being my first rebuild I was hoping for the engine to fire up and run like a top right out of the chute but that was not to be. So I assume I need to adjust the timing and maybe tweak a few things but wanted to ask if this is normal or does everyone else's rebuild fire up and run perfectly like Mr five?

Oil pressure was good and it was idling around 1500 rpms & "check engine light" remained on. I only let it run for a few min but I did ease forward in first and back in reverse and that was good.

Unfortunately I do not have time to monkey with it right now, so hoping to do this this evening. Any thing else obvious to check/adjust other than timing and maybe idle speed adjustment?[/quote

Congrats, for sure. My last engine work on start up for the first time was the same as your experiencing. When I finally put a timing light on it I found the timing slightly to the right of TDC. After dialing it in everything was good.
 

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Yes, it probably distributor related. Problem I always have is to compensate for the rotor turning as the distributor is pushed in or seated into the hole because of the gear on the distributor being beveled, when the marks are lined up the rotor has to point directly at the No. 4 post on the cap. It's not uncommon to get the distributor off a tooth one way or the other.
 

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Take a breather and enjoy your birthday if you haven't already. You will get this sorted out, and in the meantime, Happy Birthday!
 

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I wish I had a solution for you to try. I do know of a member here who had a huge backfire on his 89 RS that he said sounded like a gun shot, which blew his muffler apart. He didn't experiance any future problems and I'm not sure what causes the backfire. But leads me to think that maybe, just maybe, judging from what you've said that a backfire strong enough could have been felt in the engine with maybe some resulting damage. I know others will follow up on this post and most are smarter mechanics than me. Maybe, if you haven't done a compression check since the backfire one might be a good place to start. For an engine to run there must be fuel. ignition, and compression, all in the correct sequence. Not much help, but we have to keep communicating till we can get this sorted out.
 

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Thinking out loud, that your compression numbers being good should mean the integrity of your engine should be good. And with spark occurring on all 4 at the right time, then all's left is fuel, meaning a check of the wiring to the injectors to assure nothing shook loose when backfire happened. If ok I would see if all the injectors are getting signals to deliver fuel to the cylinders. Sure a puzzler.
 

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Hard to understand why the fuel pressure gauge won't read
yet fuel pressing against your finger seems to confirm pressure and the fact that the plugs are wet. I don't know the resistance value of the injectors, maybe someone has a spare one laying around and could confirm the reading. 3.5 when it should be 13 could be where your problem..The injector is grounded through the ecm, and when it is the fuel to the cylinders delivered if the injectors are 10 ohms lower than they should be would in my opinion be way to much fuel The red arrow pointing to the line that comes off the forward end of fuel rail and goes to the fpr. Would be a good place for fuel pressure testng.
 

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If you've got spark and compression, all at the right times, it should run if it has fuel. Will it light-off with a shot of starting fluid in the intake?

Was my thought Ed. I keep asking myself, why won't it run if the engine has compression, ignition and fuel. I've used starting fluid spray to start many engines that had problems elsewhere that I was later able to diagnose. Wish I was closer as probably many here wish too. I know sometimes 2heads and eyes are better than one. I'll keep following along and I know this engine will run..
 
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OK so I had thought my problem was fuel related so when I got pressure I was hoping this was the problem. Put it all back together and same thing; no start or it'll start and spit and sputter a bit on less than 4 cylinders before dying.

So, seems like it is getting fuel and ignition but not where it should be. Wonder if the timing belt could be off one tooth. I know it'll run with the ignition timing off quite a few degrees. When I first started mine after the weber installation, it started, then when I finally put a light on it. it was on the wrong side of TDC by a degree or so but still ran. I don't have any experience with how far off valve timing might be and the engine still running.
 

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giusedtobe said:
I've been enjoying the usable Trooper the last few months and catching up on neglected projects so I haven't done much to the old Troop lately.

In the vein of NOT being a parts changer I tried multiple tests to isolate the rich running condition and the starting issue. All to no avail and the tests showed a functioning MAF even though it did not behave like it did. Fast forward to a week or so ago I decided to lump it and buy the expensive refurbished MAF assembly from Rock Auto. Damn thing was ~$100. Remember I had already bought their aftermarket MAF sensor and it did not fit nor work.

Dennis sent me one from his old truck and I installed it and the problem was basically the same. So I had tried three different MAF's with same result.

Installed the pricey one today, fired it up and all I can say is WOW! Honestly I was expecting no change but it ran like a top. Not running rich at all. The starting issue is gone and it had much better power with no misfiring or stumbling. I am beyond elated and did I mention no check engine light!!

Now this is what I was hoping for after rebuild. Thanks again for all the help you guys have offered on this project. Thought you might be interested in an update. Now its time to move on to the chassis & I'll post changes as I make them.

Regards,
Alan
Great. When electronics was introduced into mechanical systems ITEC) With engine parameters controlled by basically a computer, troubleshooting sometimes simple problems became more involved and also sometimes totally frustating. Great, because you stuck with it and the end result is as I said, Great.
 

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gruff54 said:
Ed Mc. said:
2 happiest days of a boater's life: when they buy a boat, and when they sell it!! :drunken: :mrgreen:
Agreed!
Yep, had quite a few throughout my life. Last one strictly a fishing rig as I lived on the lake. See if the others might jog a memory, First was a Dorsett, No. 2 a Glasspar, and no. 3 a Mark Twain.
 

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Looks like maybe a winch would have been handy in all that mud. Glad to see she held up through all that
 
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